Contact HealthDay
Tel: 203.855.1400 or E-mail

News By Specialty

Allergy
Anesthesiology
Cardiology
Cosmetic Surgery
Critical Care
Dermatology
Diabetes & Endocrinology
Emergency Medicine
Family Practice
Gastroenterology
Geriatrics
Hematology & Oncology
HIV & AIDS
Infectious Disease
Internal Medicine
Nephrology
Neurology
Nursing
OBGYN & Women's Health
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics
Otolaryngology
Pain Management
Pathology
Pediatrics
Pharmacy
Psychiatry
Pulmonology
Radiology
Rheumatology
Surgery
Urology

Follow us on:

    


e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


Abdominal Pain Is Often Chronic, Prolonged in Children
Most children presenting with abdominal pain fulfill criteria for chronic abdominal pain

THURSDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of children presenting to primary care with abdominal pain develop chronic abdominal pain, with a median duration of 7.5 months, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Yvonne Lisman-van Leeuwen, Ph.D., from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study involving 305 children aged 4 to 17 years (median age, 7.8 years; 189 girls and 116 boys) to assess the prevalence, incidence, and duration of chronic abdominal pain. Follow-up at three, six, nine, and 12 months was via standardized questionnaire.

The researchers found that 78.7 percent of participants met the criteria for chronic abdominal pain at at least one follow-up point. The cumulative incidence of chronic abdominal pain was 60.1 percent among the 163 children at risk for developing chronic abdominal pain, and was higher in girls than boys. Abdominal pain had a median duration of 7.5 months, with the longest duration of pain among 10- to 17-year-olds. A less favorable prognosis was seen for children with symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome compared to those with symptoms of functional dyspepsia or functional abdominal pain.

"The presence and development of chronic abdominal pain is common and of long duration among children consulting in primary care for abdominal pain," the authors write. "These poor outcome data warrant follow-up."

Abstract
Full Text



Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

April 21, 2014

Archive Search

By Keyword:
By Category:
By Topic:

Related Articles

Most People Experience Thoughts Associated With OCD

AMA Examines Economic Impact of Physicians

FDA Approves Ragwitek for Adult Ragweed Allergy

White House: 8 Million People Signed Up for Health Insurance

Int'l Medical Education Standards Not Equivalent to U.K. Standards

Indoor Tanning Tied to Unhealthy Weight Control Behavior CME