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Physical Function Limitations Prevalent in Prediabetes
Middle-aged and older adults with prediabetes have increased odds of physical function limitations

TUESDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged and older adults with prediabetes have an increased likelihood of physical function limitations, according to a study published online June 11 in Diabetes Care.

Pearl G. Lee, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues evaluated the prevalence of physical function limitations using data from 5,991 respondents ≥53 years of age participating in the 2006 wave of the Health and Retirement Study. Physical function limitations and comorbidities (chronic diseases and geriatric conditions) were self-reported by all respondents.

Twenty-eight percent of respondents had prediabetes, with measured glycosylated hemoglobin of 5.7 to 6.4 percent. The researchers found that 32 percent of respondents had mobility limitations (walking several blocks and/or climbing a flight of stairs), while 56 and 33 percent, respectively, had lower- (getting up from a chair and/or stooping, kneeling, or crouching) and upper-extremity limitations (pushing or pulling heavy objects and/or lifting over 10 pounds). The highest prevalence of comorbidities and physical function limitations was seen for those with diabetes, followed by those with prediabetes and normoglycemia. Those with prediabetes had significantly higher odds of having functional limitations that affected mobility, the lower extremities, and the upper extremities (odds ratio, 1.48, 1.35, and 1.37, respectively), compared to those with normoglycemia. After adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, the odds of having lower-extremity limitation was still significantly increased (odds ratio, 1.21).

"Comorbidities and physical function limitations are prevalent among middle-aged and older adults with prediabetes," the authors write. "Effective lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes must accommodate physical function limitations."

Abstract
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April 23, 2014

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