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Depression in Women Tied to Diabetes, Cardiac Risk Factors
Correlation between depressive symptoms and BMI, insulin levels and resistance, C-reactive protein

WEDNESDAY, June 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms and antidepressant use correlate with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and biomarkers of glucose dysregulation and inflammation, according to a study published online June 13 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Yunsheng Ma, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, and colleagues analyzed data from 71,809 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative. Women were recruited from 1993 to 1998, and data were collected at three-year intervals through 2005. The correlation between depressive symptoms and antidepressant use and BMI, waist circumference, and biomarkers for glucose dysregulation and inflammation was assessed.

The researchers found that both elevated depressive symptoms and antidepressant use correlated significantly with higher BMI and waist circumference. There was a significant correlation between elevated depressive symptoms in 1,950 women with increased insulin levels and measures of insulin resistance. Both elevated depressive symptoms and antidepressant use correlated with elevated C-reactive protein levels in analyses of baseline data from 2,242 women.

"Monitoring body habitus and other biomarkers among women with elevated depression symptoms or taking antidepressant medication may be prudent to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease," the authors write.

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April 20, 2014

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