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Repeat Hospitalization Factors for Nursing Home Residents Studied
Poor survival for cognitively impaired with repeat hospitalization for same infections, dehydration

TUESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment have significantly lower survival if they are repeatedly hospitalized for dehydration or infection, according to a research letter published in the July 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Joan M. Teno, M.D., from Brown University in Providence, R.I., and colleagues analyzed data from 1.3 million nursing home residents who had a Cognitive Performance Score of 4, 5, or 6 (indicating moderate to very severe cognitive impairment) at a baseline assessment between 2000 and 2008 and survived for at least 30 days after that assessment.

The researchers found that, during the course of one year, at least two hospitalizations occurred for pneumonia for 1.78 percent of residents, urinary tract infections for 4.33 percent, septicemia for 1.58 percent, and dehydration for 3.49 percent. Although overall survival was 476 days, residents with two or more complications defining a burdensome transition had significantly lower adjusted survival, at only 95 days for pneumonia, 146 days for urinary tract infection, 111 days for dehydration or nutrition, and 89 days for septicemia.

"Nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment who underwent multiple hospitalizations for the same infections or dehydration had poor survival," Teno and colleagues conclude.

One author disclosed financial relationships with several companies.

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April 17, 2014

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