Contact HealthDay
Tel: 203.855.1400 or E-mail

News By Specialty

Allergy
Anesthesiology
Cardiology
Cosmetic Surgery
Critical Care
Dermatology
Diabetes & Endocrinology
Emergency Medicine
Family Practice
Gastroenterology
Geriatrics
Hematology & Oncology
HIV & AIDS
Infectious Disease
Internal Medicine
Nephrology
Neurology
Nursing
OBGYN & Women's Health
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics
Otolaryngology
Pain Management
Pathology
Pediatrics
Pharmacy
Psychiatry
Pulmonology
Radiology
Rheumatology
Surgery
Urology

Follow us on:

    


e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


Newer Anticoagulants Linked to Gastrointestinal Bleeding
Risk highest for venous thrombosis or acute coronary syndrome

FRIDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking the new generation of oral anticoagulants appear to have a higher risk of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with standard care, particularly when treated for venous thrombosis or acute coronary syndrome, according to a review published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

I. Lisanne Holster, M.D., from the Erasmus MC University Medical Centre in Rotterdam, Netherlands, and colleagues identified and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of 43 published randomized controlled trials involving 151,578 patients comparing the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding after treatment with the new generation of oral anticoagulants or standard care.

The researchers found that, although the overall risk of gastrointestinal bleeding was higher among patients taking oral anticoagulants (odds ratio [OR], 1.45), there was substantial heterogeneity among studies. The risk was highest for patients treated for venous thrombosis (OR, 1.59) and acute coronary syndrome (OR, 5.21). The bleeding risk was higher for apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban (ORs, 1.23 to 1.58) and lower for edoxaban (OR, 0.31). The overall risk of clinically relevant bleeding was also higher for the oral anticoagulant group (OR, 1.16), with similar trends seen among subgroups.

"In conclusion, we have shown that the gastrointestinal bleeding risk associated with the new generation of oral anticoagulants use might be higher compared with standard care," Holster and colleagues write. "The current evidence, however, is based on a highly selected patient group with a low bleeding risk, disallowing a true reflection of future patients in daily clinical practice."

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial



Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

April 23, 2014

Archive Search

By Keyword:
By Category:
By Topic:

Related Articles

FDA Approves Cyramza for Gastric Cancer

Type of Attending Doc Affects Feeding Tube Rates in Elderly

Considerable Sudden Death in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy CME

Lipid Genes Have Pleiotropic Impact on Glucose-Linked Traits CME

Lorazepam No Better Than Diazepam for Epilepsy in Kids

Majority of Americans Support ACA Birth Control Mandate