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Support for Banning Smoking in Locations With Children
Widespread support for ban in vehicles with young children, daycare/babysitting facilities

WEDNESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Most adults support banning smoking in locations where children are present, including vehicles, businesses, and daycare/babysitting facilities, according to a report published by the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital.

Researchers from the from the hospital in Ann Arbor, Mich., surveyed a nationally representative random sample of 1,996, adults (58 percent completion rate) regarding their opinion on smoking bans in locations where children are present.

The researchers found that 82 percent of adults expressed support for a smoking ban in vehicles with children younger than 13 years. Three-quarters of respondents supported a smoking ban in homes where the children have asthma or another lung disease. A majority of participants also supported bans in businesses where children are allowed (87 percent); any home/facility where children go for daycare or babysitting (88 percent); and inside any home where infants live (68 percent). Even current smokers supported bans to protect children from smoke exposure. For example, 60 percent of current smokers strongly support a ban on smoking in cars with children younger than 13 years present.

"Smoke is a real health hazard for kids whose lungs are still developing, and especially for kids who have illnesses like asthma where the lungs are particularly fragile and flare up when exposed to secondhand smoke," Matthew M. Davis, M.D., director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health, said in a statement.

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April 17, 2014

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