Contact HealthDay
Tel: 203.855.1400 or E-mail

News By Specialty

Allergy
Anesthesiology
Cardiology
Cosmetic Surgery
Critical Care
Dermatology
Diabetes & Endocrinology
Emergency Medicine
Family Practice
Gastroenterology
Geriatrics
Hematology & Oncology
HIV & AIDS
Infectious Disease
Internal Medicine
Nephrology
Neurology
Nursing
OBGYN & Women's Health
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics
Otolaryngology
Pain Management
Pathology
Pediatrics
Pharmacy
Psychiatry
Pulmonology
Radiology
Rheumatology
Surgery
Urology

Follow us on:

    


e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


Exposure to Tobacco Smoke Higher in Children With Asthma
From 1999 to 2010, drop in percentage of children without asthma exposed to environmental smoke

THURSDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2010, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure decreased for children without asthma, but did not change among children with asthma, according to a report published online Aug. 8 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Kenneth B. Quinto, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues from the NHCS in Hyattsville, Md., used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to present trends in ETS exposure in children with and without asthma from 1999 to 2010. Differences by sex, race and ethnicity, income, and age group were described for 2007 to 2010.

The researchers found that the percentage of children without asthma exposed to ETS decreased from 57.3 percent in 1999 to 44.2 percent in 2010, while no change was seen for children with asthma, with 57.9 and 54.0 percent exposed to ETS in 1999 to 2002 and 2007 to 2010, respectively. The percentage of children with asthma who were exposed to ETS was higher than children without asthma in 2007 to 2010. Children with asthma who were girls, Mexican-American, aged 6 to 11 years, or had family income below 350 percent of the federal poverty guidelines were more likely to be exposed to ETS in 2007 to 2010.

"ETS exposure among children with asthma was higher (54.0 percent) than for those without asthma (44.2 percent) in 2007 to 2010," the authors write.

More Information



Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

July 31, 2014

Archive Search

By Keyword:
By Category:
By Topic:

Related Articles

Slow Progress Toward Meaningful Use Stage 2

Survival Up for Hematopoietic-Cell Transplant in SCID

IOM Recommends Restructuring GME Financing

Access for Pharmaceutical Sales Reps Continuing to Decline

RA Patients Will Trade Efficacy for Less Frequent, Shorter Treatment

CDC: Annual COPD Costs to Hit $49 Billion by 2020