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Combo Pulsed, Non-Ablative Laser Treatment Is Safe
Authors say combination treatment achieves more dramatic facial results after just one treatment

TUESDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- For facial rejuvenation, a combination treatment of an optimized intense pulsed light source and a non-ablative fractional laser is safe and effective, according to a study published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

C. Stanley Chan, M.D., from SkinCare Physicians in Chestnut Hill, Mass., and colleagues compared the results from 10 subjects (Group A) who received full face treatments with a non-ablative fractional either followed or preceded by an optimized intense pulsed light source and 26 subjects (Group B) who received only full face treatments with the same non-ablative, fractional laser device.

The researchers found that, for patients in Group A, the overall average Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale for all patients improved from baseline to one month following one treatment (average improvement of 0.4; P < 0.10), with an average pigment improvement score of 1.8 on a 4-point scale. From baseline to three months, the average Fitzpatrick Wrinkle Scale improved significantly in Group B (average improvement of 0.8; P < 0.001), with an average pigment improvement score of 1.4. There was no difference in adverse events between the two groups.

"The combination of an optimized intense pulsed light source with a non-ablative fractional laser during the same treatment session is safe and effective," the authors write.

Palomar Medical funded the study and provided some equipment used in the study.

Abstract
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July 28, 2014

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