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Being at Healthy Weight, Active Could Halve Endometrial Cancers
Estimates suggest 59 percent of endometrial cancers could be prevented with healthy weight, activity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Being at a healthy weight and being physically active could prevent more than half of all cases of endometrial cancer in the United States, according to a report published Sept. 10 by the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR).

Noting that about 49,600 cases of endometrial cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year, researchers from the WCRF/AICR conducted a systematic review of the literature to provide a comprehensive and current description of the correlation between food, nutrition, physical activity, body fatness, and endometrial cancer.

According to the report, endometrial cancer is the most common cancer of the female reproductive organs, with more cases each year of endometrial cancer than of ovarian and cervical cancer combined. There is convincing evidence that excess body weight increases risk, while probable evidence suggests that being active decreases risk. Being at a healthy weight and being physically active could prevent an estimated 59 percent of endometrial cancers. Probable evidence also links coffee intake with decreased risk and glycemic load with increased risk. Limited evidence suggests that sedentary habits and adult attained height correlate with increased risk, while no conclusions could be drawn regarding cereals, fruits, vegetables, legumes, or other foods or food groups.

"We know many American women can reduce their risk of endometrial cancer, as well as other cancers, heart disease and diabetes; this is a great reason to take a look at your diet and physical activity and take steps to move more and eat smarter," Alice Bender, AICR Nutrition Communications Manager, said in a statement.

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August 29, 2014

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