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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


Health Worker Roles Impacted When 'Undervalued' by Patients
Frustrations can affect both performance and pay

FRIDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Job satisfaction among nurse practitioners and other professionals can suffer when clientele lack a clear understanding of what they do, according to research published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Academy of Management Journal.

Michael C. Pratt, from Boston College, studied individuals in four professions and found those professionals, including 13 nurse practitioners, often had to educate clients and manage their expectations.

For example, nurse practitioners sometimes experience resistance from patients who insist on being seen by a doctor, despite the fact that the nurse practitioner is qualified to conduct an exam and prescribe medication. These sorts of "image discrepancies" can adversely affect a professional's job satisfaction and even their pay.

"I was surprised at the depth of how this affected job performance. It's not simply annoying -- it has real impact," Pratt told HealthDay.

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April 17, 2014

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