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Demand for Doctors Remained High in 2012
Physician recruiters from 156 organizations conducted nearly 5,000 active searches in 2012

THURSDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Demand for physicians, particularly primary care physicians remains high, according to a report published by the Association of Staff Physician Recruiters (ASPR).

Researchers from ASPR surveyed 366 in-house physician recruitment professionals from 154 organizations to examine trends in physician recruitment.

According to the report, 4,719 active searches were conducted during calendar year 2012, 45 percent of which were to replace a departing provider. Each organization performed about 20 searches in 2012 and employed one in-house physician recruiter. The median number of searches conducted per recruiter was 15, with variation according to geography and population size. One-third of searches remained open by the end of the year, while 58 percent were filled. Nearly 70 percent of responding organizations reported searching for a family medicine provider and about 38 and 43 percent of nurse practitioner and physician assistant searches, respectively, were specific to primary care. Physician searches were more frequently performed for family medicine, hospital medicine, internal medicine, general pediatrics, and emergency medicine. The demand for advanced practice providers accounted for more than 17 percent of all searches.

"With the improvement in the economy and the housing market, we're seeing more physicians being able to relocate or retire, resulting in increased turnover," ASPR executive director Jennifer Metivier said in a statement.

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July 30, 2014

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