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Algorithm Developed to Guide Physicians in Obesity Care
Algorithm emphasizes patients' overall health and reducing their risk of obesity-linked conditions

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- An algorithm has been developed to help physicians navigate medical treatment for obesity care, according to a report published by the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP).

Researchers have developed and written an obesity algorithm, which aims to provide all physicians with training and tools for prescribing and implementing an obesity treatment plan, tailored to each patient.

The algorithm emphasizes patients' overall health and reducing their risk of developing obesity-linked conditions. Following an examination of current lifestyle and family history, a physical examination, and laboratory testing, specific changes will be recommended. These changes relate to diet and nutrition, physical activity, counseling, and medication, as appropriate.

"Physicians are now confronted with the need to understand what makes obesity a disease and how patients affected by obesity are best managed," Deborah Bade Horn, D.O., M.P.H., ASBP president-elect and Algorithm Committee co-chair, said in a statement. "They can benefit from the algorithm, which compiles the experience of researchers and clinicians who engage in obesity treatment on a day-to-day basis."

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April 17, 2014

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