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AAP: Brain Injury Linked to Depression in Children
Association remains even after adjusting for multiple factors

FRIDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with brain injury are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, even after adjusting for multiple factors, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics, held from Oct. 26 to 29 in Orlando, Fla.

Matthew C. Wylie, M.D., and colleagues from Brown University in Providence, R.I., analyzed data from parental interviews to determine the prevalence of brain injury and depression among 81,936 children in the United States in 2007.

The researchers found that the national prevalence of brain injury was 1.9 percent and the prevalence of depression was 3.7 percent. The risk of diagnosed depression was significantly higher in children with brain injury (odds ratio, 4.9). The association remained after adjusting for factors such as age, ethnicity, family income, and child health (odds ratio, 2.2).

"Brain injury remains significantly associated with depression in children despite adjustment for known predictors," Wylie said colleagues conclude. "This study may enable better prognostication for brain-injured children and facilitate identification of those at high risk of depression."

Abstract
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September 16, 2014

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