Contact HealthDay
Tel: 203.855.1400 or E-mail

News By Specialty

Allergy
Anesthesiology
Cardiology
Cosmetic Surgery
Critical Care
Dermatology
Diabetes & Endocrinology
Emergency Medicine
Family Practice
Gastroenterology
Geriatrics
Hematology & Oncology
HIV & AIDS
Infectious Disease
Internal Medicine
Nephrology
Neurology
Nursing
OBGYN & Women's Health
Ophthalmology
Orthopedics
Otolaryngology
Pain Management
Pathology
Pediatrics
Pharmacy
Psychiatry
Pulmonology
Radiology
Rheumatology
Surgery
Urology

Follow us on:

    


e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


Triage System Underperforms in Children With Chronic Illness
Manchester Triage System performance lower for those with versus those without chronic illnesses

MONDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For children presenting to the emergency department with infectious symptoms, performance of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) is lower for those with chronic illnesses, compared to those without chronic illnesses, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Pediatrics.

Nienke Seiger, M.D., from the University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands, and colleagues assessed the validity of the MTS for children with chronic illnesses using data from 8,592 children <16 years old who presented to the emergency department between 2008 and 2011 with infectious symptoms (dyspnea, diarrhea/vomiting, or fever). The urgency categories of the MTS were compared with an independent reference standard on the basis of abnormal vital signs, life-threatening working diagnosis, resource utilization, and follow-up.

The researchers found that 35 percent of those who presented to the emergency department with infectious symptoms had a chronic illness. Undertriage occurred in significantly more children with chronic illnesses (16 percent) than in those without chronic illnesses (11 percent; P < 0.001). For children with chronic illnesses, the MTS had a sensitivity of 58 percent, compared with 74 percent for children without chronic illnesses. Specificity did not differ between the groups. For children with and without chronic illnesses, the diagnostic odds ratios were 4.8 and 8.7, respectively.

"Nurses should be particularly aware of undertriage in children with chronic illnesses," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)



Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

October 30, 2014

Archive Search

By Keyword:
By Category:
By Topic:

Related Articles

Voters' Views on Affordable Care Act Split Along Party Lines

FDA Cautions Against 'Undeclared' Food Allergens

Clinical Illness, Outcomes for Ebola in Sierra Leone Reviewed

Less Competition Among Docs = Higher Medical Costs

Vaccine Approved for Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease

ADT May Up Heart-Related Deaths in Prostate Cancer Patients