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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION INFORMATION

Release Date: November 21, 2013
Last Reviewed: November 20, 2013
Expiration Date: November 21, 2014
Time to Complete Activity: 15 minutes

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of physicians with an interest in Diabetes & Endocrinology, as well as other health care professionals.

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This activity will supply up-to-date news information to practicing clinicians which can be integrated into practice and aims to increase professional competency.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Upon proper completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Summarize the significance of the study in the context of clinical care.

DISCLOSURES

In accordance with Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education requirements on disclosure, faculty and contributors are asked to disclose any relationships with commercial interests associated with the area of medicine featured in the activity. These relationships are described below.

Neither Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC, staff nor HealthDay's medical writer have financial relationships to disclose.

Peer reviewer, Cynthia Haines, M.D., has the following financial relationships to disclose:

  • Salary/Ownership Interest (stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest) - GlaxoSmithKline (Spouse)
Flavonoid Intake Inversely Linked to Type 2 Diabetes
Large European cohort shows inverse correlation, particularly for flavanols, flavonols

THURSDAY, Nov. 21, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Flavonoid intake is inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a large European study published online Oct. 15 in Diabetes Care.

Raul Zamora-Ros, Ph.D., from the MRC Epidemiology Unit in Cambridge, U.K., and colleagues examined the correlation between dietary flavonoid and lignan intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Data were used from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-InterAct case-cohort study involving 12,403 incident cases of type 2 diabetes, and a stratified sub-cohort of 16,145 participants from among 340,234 participants in eight European countries. Country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used at baseline.

The researchers observed a trend for an inverse association between total flavonoid intake and type 2 diabetes in multivariable models (hazard ratio [HR] for the highest versus the lowest quintile, 0.90; P value trend = 0.040), but not for lignans (HR, 0.88; P value trend = 0.119). A significantly reduced risk of diabetes was seen for flavonols (HR, 0.81; P value trend = 0.020) and flavanols (HR, 0.82; P value trend = 0.012), including flavan-3-ol monomers (HR, 0.73; P value trend = 0.029).

"In conclusion, this large case-cohort study conducted in eight European countries supports a role for dietary intake of flavonoids in the prevention of type 2 diabetes in men and women," the authors write. "These results highlight the potential protective effect of eating a diet rich in flavonoids (a dietary pattern based on plant-based foods) on type 2 diabetes risk."

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October 25, 2014

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