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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION INFORMATION

Release Date: December 2, 2013
Last Reviewed: November 25, 2013
Expiration Date: December 2, 2014
Time to Complete Activity: 15 minutes

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of physicians with an interest in Diabetes & Endocrinology, as well as other health care professionals.

STATEMENT OF NEED

This activity will supply up-to-date news information to practicing clinicians which can be integrated into practice and aims to increase professional competency.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Upon proper completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Summarize the significance of the study in the context of clinical care.

DISCLOSURES

In accordance with Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education requirements on disclosure, faculty and contributors are asked to disclose any relationships with commercial interests associated with the area of medicine featured in the activity. These relationships are described below.

Neither Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC, staff nor HealthDay's medical writer have financial relationships to disclose.

Peer reviewer, Cynthia Haines, M.D., has the following financial relationships to disclose:

  • Salary/Ownership Interest (stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest) - GlaxoSmithKline (Spouse)
Racial Disparities Persist in Diabetes Care Outcomes
Black patients lag in recommended care even in setting of patient-centered medical home

MONDAY, Dec. 2, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients do not receive the same quality of care, and experience poorer intermediate outcomes in the practice setting of a patient-centered medical home (PCMH), according to research published online Nov. 19 in Diabetes Care.

In an effort to assess racial differences in processes of care and intermediate outcomes for diabetes, Joseph A. Simonetti, M.D., of the University of Washington in Seattle, and colleagues retrospectively analyzed data for 1,457 adults receiving care within a PCMH-designated academic practice.

The researchers found that, compared with non-Hispanic white patients, more black patients had a hemoglobin A1C greater than 9 percent, and fewer black patients achieved a hemoglobin A1C less than 7 percent, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol less than 100 mg/dL, or blood pressure less than 140/90 mm Hg (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). According to multivariable analysis, black patients were less likely to receive hemoglobin A1C testing (odds ratio [OR], 0.57) or influenza vaccination (OR, 0.75) and also less likely to achieve LDL cholesterol less than 100 mg/dL (OR, 0.74) or blood pressure less than 140/90 mm Hg (OR, 0.64).

"In summary, despite the implementation of a highly innovative PCMH, we observed racial differences in both processes of care and intermediate outcomes for patients with diabetes," the authors write.

Abstract
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September 21, 2014

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