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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION INFORMATION

Release Date: December 3, 2013
Last Reviewed: November 26, 2013
Expiration Date: December 3, 2014
Time to Complete Activity: 15 minutes

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of physicians with an interest in Diabetes & Endocrinology, as well as other health care professionals.

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This activity will supply up-to-date news information to practicing clinicians which can be integrated into practice and aims to increase professional competency.

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Upon proper completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Summarize the significance of the study in the context of clinical care.

DISCLOSURES

In accordance with Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education requirements on disclosure, faculty and contributors are asked to disclose any relationships with commercial interests associated with the area of medicine featured in the activity. These relationships are described below.

Neither Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC, staff nor HealthDay’s medical writer have financial relationships to disclose.

Peer reviewer, Cynthia Haines, M.D., has the following financial relationships to disclose:

  • Salary/Ownership Interest (stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest) - GlaxoSmithKline (Spouse)
Central Adiposity May Blunt Metabolism, Worsen Weight Gain
At BMI greater than 29.5, awake and fed thermogenesis is inversely related to body adiposity

TUESDAY, Dec. 3, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- In those with body mass index (BMI) greater than 29 kg/m², awake and fed thermogenesis is reduced, and this change in energy balance predicts future weight gain, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

Paolo Piaggi, M.D., of the National Institutes of Health in Phoenix, and colleagues measured whole-room 24-hour energy expenditure (EE) in 509 healthy subjects (368 Native Americans and 141 whites) who consumed a eucaloric diet, calculated awake and fed thermogenesis (AFT), then used follow-up data for 290 Native Americans to assess the association between AFT and weight change.

The researchers found that AFT accounted for approximately 10 percent of 24-hour EE and was inversely related to age and fasting glucose concentration. Energy intake was the main factor that determined AFT. For individuals with BMI greater than 29 kg/m², AFT was inversely related to BMI. After accounting for covariates, the residual variance of AFT predicted future weight change, but only in those with BMI greater than 29 kg/m².

"AFT may influence daily energy balance, is reduced in obese individuals, and predicts future weight gain in these subjects," the authors write. "Once central adiposity develops, a blunting of AFT may occur that then contributes to further weight gain."

Abstract
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August 22, 2014

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