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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION INFORMATION

Release Date: February 11, 2014
Last Reviewed: February 7, 2014
Expiration Date: February 11, 2015
Time to Complete Activity: 15 minutes

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of physicians with an interest in Diabetes & Endocrinology and Hematology & Oncology, as well as other health care professionals.

STATEMENT OF NEED

This activity will supply up-to-date news information to practicing clinicians which can be integrated into practice and aims to increase professional competency.

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Upon proper completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Summarize the significance of the study in the context of clinical care.

DISCLOSURES

In accordance with Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education requirements on disclosure, faculty and contributors are asked to disclose any relationships with commercial interests associated with the area of medicine featured in the activity. These relationships are described below.

Neither Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC, staff nor HealthDay’s medical writer have financial relationships to disclose.

Peer reviewer, Cynthia Haines, M.D., has the following financial relationships to disclose:

  • Salary/Ownership Interest (stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest) - GlaxoSmithKline (Spouse)
Metformin Use Doesn't Cut Incidence of Bladder Cancer
No reduction in risk with increasing duration of metformin use relative to sulfonylureas

TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, metformin use is not associated with a significantly reduced risk of bladder cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Diabetes Care.

Ronac Mamtani, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a cohort study involving 87,600 patients with type 2 diabetes in The Health Improvement Network database. The incidence of bladder cancer in new users of metformin and sulfonylureas was examined. Metformin or sulfonylurea use was treated as a time-dependent variable. The authors hoped to address the time-related biases that may have affected previous studies relating to the effect of metformin on cancer risk.

The researchers identified 196 incident bladder cancers in the metformin cohort and 66 in the sulfonylurea cohort. The risk of bladder cancer was not significantly decreased in association with metformin use (hazard ratio, 0.81; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 1.09). The correlation was not affected by sex (P for interaction = 0.20). There was also no reduction in bladder cancer risk with increased duration of metformin use relative to use of sulfonylureas (three to less than four years of use: 0.57 [95 percent CI, 0.25 to 1.34]; four to less than five years of use: 0.93 [95 percent CI, 0.30 to 2.85]; and five or more years of use: 1.18 [95 percent CI, 0.44 to 3.19]; P for trend = 0.26).

"Similar methods should be used to study other cancers that have previously been identified as potentially preventable with metformin," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
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November 25, 2014

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