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ALA: Women Have Misperceptions About Lung Cancer
Report shows many women are unaware of incidence, poor survival rates, risk for nonsmokers

WEDNESDAY, May 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women have misperceptions about the incidence and risks of lung cancer, according to a report from the American Lung Association's (ALA) inaugural Women's Lung Health Barometer.

The ALA surveyed more than 1,000 American women, aged 18 years and older, regarding their awareness, knowledge, and perceptions about lung cancer.

According to the report, only 1 percent of women cited lung cancer as a cancer that affects women. More than half of women believe that breast cancer kills more women than lung cancer, although deaths associated with lung cancer surpassed those of breast cancer more than 25 years ago. Although 58 percent of women claimed to be knowledgeable about lung cancer, many were lacking basic knowledge relating to lung cancer, including low one-year survival rates and the low percentage with early diagnosis. About half of women (49 percent), including 68 percent of never smokers, reported being unconcerned about lung cancer because of their smoking status. However, 10 percent of lung cancer cases are among never smokers, and women with lung cancer are twice as likely as men to be never smokers.

"The Barometer shows that women are willing to commit to this fight alongside us and make lung cancer a cause that people care about. When women learn the truth about lung cancer -- especially the shocking mortality facts -- they are more likely to take action to address lung cancer," according to the ALA news release.

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September 1, 2014

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