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e-Healthcare Leadership Awards


CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION INFORMATION

Release Date: July 7, 2014
Last Reviewed: July 2, 2014
Expiration Date: July 7, 2015
Time to Complete Activity: 15 minutes

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of physicians with an interest in Cardiology, as well as other health care professionals.

STATEMENT OF NEED

This activity will supply up-to-date news information to practicing clinicians which can be integrated into practice and aims to increase professional competency.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Upon proper completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Summarize the significance of the study in the context of clinical care.

DISCLOSURES

In accordance with Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education requirements on disclosure, faculty and contributors are asked to disclose any relationships with commercial interests associated with the area of medicine featured in the activity. These relationships are described below.

Neither Paradigm Medical Communications, LLC, staff nor HealthDay’s medical writer have financial relationships to disclose.

Peer reviewer, Cynthia Haines, M.D., has the following financial relationships to disclose:

  • Salary/Ownership Interest (stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest) - GlaxoSmithKline (Spouse)
Substantial Variation in Infection Rates Post-CABG
Observed variation of 18.2 percent in health care-acquired infection rates across medical centers

MONDAY, July 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, the variation in observed health care-acquired infection (HAI) rates across centers is 18.2 percent, according to a study published online July 1 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Terry Shih, M.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues examined the rates of HAIs in 20,896 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery at 33 medical centers in Michigan between Jan. 1, 2009, and June 30, 2012. Pneumonia, sepsis/septicemia, and surgical site infections were included as HAIs.

The researchers found that the overall HAI rate was 5.1 percent (isolated pneumonia, 3.1 percent; isolated sepsis/septicemia, 0.5 percent; isolated deep sternal wound infection, 0.5 percent; isolated harvest/cannulation site, 0.5 percent; isolated thoracotomy, 0.02 percent; multiple infections, 0.6 percent). There was variation in HAI subtypes across strata of center-level HAI rates. The predicted HAI risk differed by 2.8 percent across centers in absolute terms (3.9 to 6.7 percent; min:max), while the variation in observed rates was 18.2 percent (0.9 to 19.1 percent).

"There was an 18.2 percent difference in observed HAI rates across medical centers among patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery," the authors write. "This variability could not be explained by patient case mix. Future work should focus on the impact of other factors (e.g., organizational and systems of clinical care) on risk of HAIs."

Abstract
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October 24, 2014

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