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January 2020 Briefing - Cardiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2020. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Hydromorphone-CR Exposure Ups Heart Infection Risk in PWID

FRIDAY, Jan. 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to controlled-release hydromorphone, an opioid that can be abused through crushing and injection, is associated with an increased risk for infective endocarditis among people who inject drugs, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Electrical Cardioversion Effective for Acute A-Fib in Emergency Setting

FRIDAY, Jan. 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients in the emergency department with acute atrial fibrillation, pharmacological cardioversion followed by electrical cardioversion (drug-shock) and electrical cardioversion alone (shock-only) strategies are highly effective for restoring sinus rhythm, with similar outcomes for different pad positions, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Lancet.

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2017 to 2018 Saw Increase in Life Expectancy in the United States

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2017 to 2018, there was an increase in life expectancy in the United States and a decrease in age-adjusted death rates, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics.

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Comorbidities Tied to Higher Rates of All-Cause Admissions in MS Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Comorbidities increase the rate of all-cause, but not multiple sclerosis (MS)-specific, hospital admissions among patients with MS, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders.

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U.S. Spends More on Health Care, but Has Worse Life Expectancy

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The United States spends substantially more than any other wealthy nation on health care, yet it has a lower life expectancy and a higher suicide rate than other wealthy nations, according to a January data brief released by the Commonwealth Fund.

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Exposure to Diesel Exhaust May Impair Endothelial Function

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term exposure to diesel exhaust fumes has an adverse impact on endothelial function and vascular wall properties, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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Survey: Most Americans Think of Themselves as Healthy

TUESDAY, Jan. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Seven out of 10 Americans rate their health-related behaviors and attitudes as good or excellent, according to a survey released Jan. 27 by the American Osteopathic Association.

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Gender Gap Persists in Starting Salary for Physicians

TUESDAY, Jan. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The gender gap in starting salary for physicians persists, although it is unclear which factors account for this gap, according to a report published online Jan. 22 in Health Affairs.

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Wealthy Pay Most to Finance U.S. Health Care

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Health care payments in the United States are more regressive than previously thought, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Health Services Research.

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Unmet Need for Physician Care Not Improving With More Insured

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Most measures of unmet need for physician services in the United States have not improved since 1998 despite gains in health insurance coverage, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Model Shows Transitional Care Cost-Effective in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Transitional care services are cost-effective for the postdischarge management of older patients with heart failure, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Prehospital Epinephrine Aids Out-of-Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Arrests

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Prehospital administration of epinephrine may aid pediatric patients following out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs), according to a study published in the Jan. 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Potential Links ID'd for Marijuana Use, Cardiovascular Risks

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a review published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, potential associations are presented for marijuana use and cardiovascular risks.

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LV Hypertrophy May Explain Racial Disparities in Heart Failure

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A "malignant" subphenotype of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with minimal elevations in cardiac biomarkers is associated with an increased risk for heart failure, with some of the excess risk for heart failure among blacks explained by a higher prevalence of malignant LVH, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Circulation.

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Effects of Vit D Correction on CV Health Studied in Obese Children

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For vitamin D-deficient overweight and obese children, high-dose supplementation with vitamin D does not improve measures of arterial endothelial function or stiffness, but it does result in reductions in blood pressure (BP) and fasting glucose concentration, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Nearly Half of U.S. Smokers Not Advised by Doctors to Quit

FRIDAY, Jan. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Too few American smokers are advised by their doctors to quit, according to a report released Thursday by U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, M.D.

The New York Times Article
Office of the Surgeon General

Health Care Utilization Up for Seniors With Untreated Apnea

FRIDAY, Jan. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Older adult Medicare beneficiaries with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have increased health care utilization (HCU) and costs, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Postdischarge Mortality Up for Patients With Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Jan. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heart failure, but not those with acute myocardial infarction or pneumonia, have demonstrated an increase in postdischarge 30-day mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in The BMJ.

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Major Insurers Offer $55 Million to Lower Generic Drug Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A nonprofit that develops and sells cheaper drugs will receive a $55 million investment from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and associated organizations to create cheaper versions of expensive generic drugs.

The New York Times Article

Fewer Than Half of Clinical Trials Comply With Reporting Laws

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 is low, with only 40.9 percent of trials reporting results within one year, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in The Lancet.

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Abdominal Obesity Linked to Recurrent Atherosclerotic CVD

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Abdominal obesity is associated with an increased risk for recurrent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease after myocardial infarction, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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JumpstartMD Commercial Program Seems Effective for Weight Loss

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The commercial low-calorie, low-carbohydrate JumpstartMD program is effective for weight loss, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of Obesity.

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Systolic BP Variability in Young Adults May ID Later CVD Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Variability in systolic blood pressure (SBP) in young adults is associated with an increased subsequent risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Fast-Track Review of ACA Lawsuit Rejected by U.S. Supreme Court

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A fast-track review of a lawsuit that threatens the Affordable Care Act was rejected Tuesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.

AP News Article

Low-Carb, Low-Fat Diets Not Tied to Mortality Overall

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, low-carbohydrate diet and low-fat diet scores are not associated with total mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Prolonged ECG Monitoring for Syncope in ED Feasible, Safe

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring of patients presenting to the emergency department with syncope is a safe alternative to hospitalization, according to a study published in the January issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.

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Time of Day for Taking Warfarin Does Not Matter

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Time of day for taking warfarin makes no difference on the drug's effectiveness, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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ACP: Medicare for All Needed to Fix 'Ill' U.S. Health Care System

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Physicians (ACP) says the U.S. health care system "is ill and needs a bold new prescription" that includes coverage for all Americans and lower costs.

AP News Article
American College of Physicians

Troponin Testing May Be Overused in Geriatric Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Routine troponin testing for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may not be warranted in elderly patients with nonspecific complaints (NSCs) presenting to the emergency department, according to a study published in the January issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.

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New Guidance Issued for Care of Children With Williams Syndrome

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In an American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report, published online Jan. 21 in Pediatrics, recommendations are presented for the management of patients with Williams syndrome (WS).

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Decline in Mortality Seen in Diabetes Patients in Hong Kong

FRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2016, mortality declined among people with diabetes in Hong Kong, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Diabetologia.

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Quickly Reducing High Potassium Levels Improves Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid correction of elevated serum potassium levels (K+) is associated with reduced mortality in emergency department patients, according to a study recently published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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Single-Payer System Would Likely Save Money

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There is near consensus across 30 years of economic analysis of single-payer plans that a single-payer system would reduce health expenditures in the United States, according to a review published online Jan. 15 in PLOS Medicine.

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CDC: Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring Worse

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- More than 15 percent of American adults are physically inactive, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study.

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Ageism Predicts Significantly Worse Health Outcomes

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Ageism predicts significantly worse health outcomes, according to a review published online Jan. 15 in PLOS ONE.

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Coronary Artery Disease Risk Down in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a decrease in the risk for coronary artery disease among adult survivors of childhood cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in The BMJ.

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ACA Tied to Narrowing of Disparities in Access to Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The Affordable Care Act has reduced disparities in access to health care among black, Hispanic, and white adults, according to a January data brief released by the Commonwealth Fund.

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Outcomes Superior for HM3 LVAD Regardless of Preimplant Strategy

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with advanced heart failure, the HeartMate 3 (HM3) left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is superior to the HeartMate II (HMII), regardless of whether the device is a bridge to transplant (BTT) or a destination therapy (DT), according to a study published online Jan. 15 in JAMA Cardiology.

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FDA: Weight Control Drug Lorcaserin May Raise Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The prescription weight control medicine lorcaserin (Belviq, Belviq XR) may increase the risk for cancer, according to the results of a clinical trial assessing the safety of the drug, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

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Maternal Distress May Affect Brain Development in Fetuses With CHD

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological distress, including stress, anxiety, and depression, is prevalent among women carrying fetuses with congenital heart disease (CHD), and this distress can affect fetal neurological development, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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BP Measures Progress More Rapidly in Women Than Men

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure (BP) measures progress more rapidly in women than in men, starting in the third decade and continuing through the life course, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Evolution of Approval, Regulation Processes for Drugs Explored

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. approval and regulation processes for pharmaceutical agents have evolved during the last four decades, according to a study published in the Jan. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Doctor Replacement Ratios Higher in Largest, Hospital-Owned Practices

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2016, more physicians entering the Medicare program worked at large group or hospital-owned practices than small group or independent practices, according to a research letter published online Jan. 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Less Than a Quarter of Medicare Patients Participate in Cardiac Rehab

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- About one in four cardiac rehabilitation (CR)-eligible Medicare beneficiaries participates in CR, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Vital Exhaustion Linked to Increased Risk for Incident A-Fib

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Vital exhaustion is associated with an increased risk for incident atrial fibrillation, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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Physicians Spend >16 Minutes Per Encounter on EHR Use

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians spend a considerable amount of time using electronic health records (EHRs) to support care delivery, with wide variation seen in the distribution of time within specialty, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Antipsychotic Use Safer Than No Use in Schizophrenia

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with schizophrenia, long-term antipsychotic use does not appear to increase severe physical morbidity or somatic hospitalization, and mortality is lower for antipsychotic use compared with no use, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in World Psychiatry.

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Intensive Systolic BP Control May Not Benefit All Older Adults

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) control lowers the risk for major cardiovascular events, cognitive impairment, and death in older adults; however, these benefits may not extend to older adults with lower baseline cognitive function, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Incidental Lymphopenia Linked to Increased Risk for Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Incidental lymphopenia is associated with an increased risk for all-cause and cause-specific mortality, according to a study published in the Jan. 13 issue of CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Burnout in Med Students Tied to Perceived Stress, Phone Behavior

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of perceived stress, poorer sleep quality, and smartphone addiction contribute to burnout in osteopathic medical students, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

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California May Start Producing Its Own Medicines

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A proposal for California to contract generic drug companies to make medications would make the state the first in the country to produce its own medications.

AP News Article

Recruitment Satisfactory for Foreign-Educated Health Providers

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Foreign-educated health professionals (FEHPs) in the United States are overall satisfied with their recruitment experience, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

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Major Cardiovascular Diseases May Up Long-Term Risk for ESKD

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Major incident cardiovascular disease events are associated with an increased risk for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), with the highest risk for heart failure, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Neighborhood Disadvantage Impacts Hospital Quality Ratings

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals caring for neighborhoods with high levels of disadvantage may have lower hospital ratings due to social risk factors (SRFs) in the community, according to a study published online Dec. 30 in Medical Care.

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Metabolic Syndrome May Up Risk for VTE Recurrence After DVT

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), the presence of any component of metabolic syndrome (MetS) is independently associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Blood Advances.

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Clinical Guidelines Developed for Managing Nosebleeds

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, published online Jan. 7 in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, recommendations are presented for the management of nosebleeds.

Clinical Practice Guideline
Executive Summary

Tea Drinking Linked to Reduced Risk for Atherosclerotic CVD

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Habitual tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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Life Expectancy Free of Chronic Disease Up With Healthy Lifestyle

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to a healthy lifestyle at midlife is associated with increased life expectancy free of major chronic diseases, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in The BMJ.

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Perceived Risks of E-Cigarettes Vary With Demographics

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For youth, the perceived risks of electronic cigarette products vary with demographics, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in Health Promotion Practice.

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Large Gap Found in Health Administrative Spending for U.S., Canada

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There is a large and widening gap in health administrative spending between the United States and Canada, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Guidance Issued for Management of Fulminant Myocarditis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, published online Jan. 6 in Circulation, considerations are presented for the recognition and initial management of fulminant myocarditis (FM).

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Heart Transplants From Hep C Virus-Positive Donors Seem Safe

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Adult heart transplants from hepatitis C virus-positive (HCV+) donors appear safe, with no increased risk for adverse effects on one-year survival, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes Similar for Dialysis, Nondialysis Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), survival outcomes are similar for those on maintenance dialysis and nondialysis patients, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Low Cardiac Troponin Levels Cannot Safely Rule Out Ischemia

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Even very low concentrations of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) cannot safely rule out inducible myocardial ischemia in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Training for, Running First Marathon May Reduce Aortic Age

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Training for and completing a first marathon is associated with reduced central blood pressure and aortic stiffness, according to a study published in the Jan. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Odds of Stroke Up With Dual Use of E-Cigarettes, Cigarettes

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Dual use of electronic cigarettes and combustible cigarettes is associated with increased odds of stroke compared with not smoking or sole combustible cigarette use, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Price Hikes for Hundreds of Medications

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. drug companies have started the new year by raising the prices of hundreds of medications.

CBS News Article

Poll: Older Adults Frequently Use Online Physician Ratings

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults commonly use online ratings to choose a doctor, according to a report published online Jan. 6 based on the results of the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging.

National Poll on Healthy Aging

Bystander CPR Less Likely in Hispanic Neighborhoods

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in predominantly Hispanic neighborhoods are less likely to receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (B-CPR) and have a lower likelihood of survival, according to a study published in the Jan. 7 issue of Circulation.

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Study Explores Factors Affecting Glycemic Control in T1DM

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes with optimal and suboptimal glycemic control differ with respect to clinical and health care utilization factors, according to a study published online Dec. 2 in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

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Donor Heart Acceptance Practices Vary Across Transplant Centers

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There is great variability in donor heart acceptance decisions among U.S. transplant centers, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Public Policy Recs Updated for Familial Hypercholesterolemia

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a special communication article, published online Jan. 2 in JAMA Cardiology, updated recommendations are presented for reducing the clinical and public health burden of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH).

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Linked to Gray Matter Volume

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is positively associated with gray matter (GM) volume and total brain volume and with GM volume in specific brain areas, according to a study published in the January issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Diabetes Mellitus May Increase Risk for Developing Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk for heart failure, even in the absence of diastolic dysfunction, according to a study published in the January issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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APO(a)-LRX Found to Reduce Lipoprotein(a) Levels

THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with elevated lipoprotein(a) levels and established cardiovascular disease, hepatocyte-directed antisense oligonucleotide AKCEA-APO(a)-LRX (APO(a)-LRX) reduces lipoprotein(a) levels, according to a study published online Jan. 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Patient Experiences Modestly Worse After Hospital Acquisition

THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Modestly worse patient experiences are seen following hospital acquisition by another hospital, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Abstinence From Alcohol Cuts Arrhythmia Recurrence in A-Fib

THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In regular drinkers with atrial fibrillation, abstinence from alcohol reduces arrhythmia recurrences, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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