September 2019 Briefing - Cardiology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for September 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Panel Votes Yes to Current Level of Red, Processed Meat Intake

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An international panel suggests that adults continue their current levels of consumption of red or processed meat based on evidence from five systematic reviews published online Oct. 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Disease May Up Risk for Allopurinol-Linked Cutaneous AEs

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is associated with an increased risk for hospital admission for allopurinol-associated severe cutaneous adverse reactions, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Rivaroxaban Cuts Recurrent Blood Clots in Obese Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Real-world evidence shows that rivaroxaban reduces the risk for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in morbidly obese patients, with similar safety and efficacy as warfarin, according to a study published in the October issue of Thrombosis Research.

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Childhood Secondhand Smoke Tied to Later Atrial Fibrillation

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood secondhand smoke exposure predicts an increased risk for adulthood atrial fibrillation (AF) after adjusting for other risk factors, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Most Severe Forms of Mental Illness Lead to Highest CVD Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple mental illnesses are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in veterans, with psychosis having the largest effect sizes, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Infectious Disease Consultation May Lower Candida Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality is lower for patients with candida bloodstream infection receiving an infectious disease consultation, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Average Annual Premium for Workers Increased in 2019

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In 2019, the average annual health insurance premium for workers increased slightly for single coverage and family coverage, according to a report published online Sept. 25 in Health Affairs.

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Deep Learning Models Classify Disease From Medical Imaging

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Early evidence suggests that diagnostic performance of deep learning models is equivalent to that of health care professionals for interpreting medical imaging, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in The Lancet Digital Health.

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Severe Adverse Cardiovascular Events Associated With Ibrutinib

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular adverse drug reactions (CV-ADR) occur in association with ibrutinib, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Walking Speed Predicts Return to Work for Younger Stroke Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For younger patients with stroke, walking speed is a strong predictor for return to employment, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Stroke.

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Pediatric Heart Allocation Policy No Better for Waitlist Mortality

THURSDAY, Sept. 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The current pediatric heart allocation policy has increased congenital heart disease (CHD) status 1A representation but has not improved waitlist mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Exposure to Pesticides Tied to Cardiovascular Disease Incidence

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational exposure to pesticides is associated with cardiovascular disease incidence in the first 10 years of follow-up, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mortality Persist in the U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There are still racial and ethnic disparities in mortality, and these disparities are widening for some age groups, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Quality of Carbohydrates, Protein Has Improved in U.S. Diet

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2016, the percentage of energy intake from low-quality carbohydrates decreased and that from high-quality carbohydrates and plant protein increased, according to a study published in the Sept. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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More Blood Pressure Drugs Recalled

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The recall of the commonly prescribed blood pressure drug losartan has been expanded once again to include an additional five lots.

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Percentage of Women in Internal Med Residencies Increasing

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2016, the percentage of women in internal medicine residencies increased, but the percentage in subspecialty fellowships decreased, according to a research letter published online Sept. 23 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Machine Learning May Be Faster for Cardiac MRI Scan Analysis

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Automated machine learning (ML) analysis has the potential to provide faster analysis of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with similar levels of precision, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Nut Consumption Tied to Less Annual Weight Gain, Obesity

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing daily consumption of nuts is associated with less long-term weight gain and a lower risk for obesity in adults, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health.

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Hurricanes Up Mortality Risk for Seniors With Diabetes

TUESDAY, Sept. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Living through a hurricane increases both the short- and long-term risk for death among seniors with diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Protected Health Info Breaches Compromise Sensitive Data

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most protected health information (PHI) breaches compromise sensitive demographic and/or financial information, according to a research letter published online Sept. 23 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Women, Minorities Underrepresented in Cardiology Workforce

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Female physicians remain underrepresented in adult cardiology, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in JAMA Cardiology.

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Higher Fat Mass May Up Risk for Major Adverse CV Events in T2DM

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, higher fat mass is associated with a higher risk for major adverse cardiovascular events, according to a study published in the Sept. 23 issue of CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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More Aggressive Tx Needed for Familial Hypercholesterolemia

MONDAY, Sept. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even with care in specialty clinics, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) persists above target levels in more than half of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), according to a study published in the October issue of Atherosclerosis.

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Kidney Donation Linked to Increased Hypertension Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney donation is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Cardiovascular Disease Risk Underestimated in Patients With Mental Illness

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment tools that do not include severe mental illness as a predictor could be substantially underestimating CVD risk, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in PLOS ONE.

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SGLT2 Inhibitors Linked to Lower Risk for Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors for type 2 diabetes is associated with a reduced risk for heart failure, but not a reduced risk for major cardiovascular events, compared with use of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitors, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in The BMJ.

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House Speaker Unveils Plan to Lower Drug Costs

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has revealed a plan to lower the cost of medications for people on Medicare and those with private insurance.

AP News Article

Medical Students Not Ready to Provide Nutritional Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 19, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Medical education does not equip students to provide high-quality, effective nutrition care, according to a review published in the September issue of The Lancet Planetary Health.

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Polypill Strategy Promising in Socioeconomically Vulnerable

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a socioeconomically vulnerable minority population, a combination pill (polypill) leads to greater reductions in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, according to a study published in the Sept. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Nonphysician Providers Rarely Interpret Diagnostic Images

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Despite increasing roles of nonphysician providers (NPPs) in health care (nurse practitioners and physician assistants), they still rarely interpret diagnostic imaging studies, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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2002 to 2016 Saw Rise in Drug Abuse-Linked Infective Endocarditis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) associated with drug abuse (DA) increased from 2002 to 2016 in the United States, with increases seen in all regions, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Aortic, Mitral Regurgitation Risk Up With Fluoroquinolone Use

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for aortic and mitral regurgitation is increased with current and recent fluoroquinolone (FQ) use, according to a study published in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Prenatal, Postnatal Exposures Tied to Blood Pressure in Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal and postnatal exposure to chemicals, environment, and meteorological factors may impact blood pressure (BP) in children, according to a study published in the Sept. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Combo Antithrombotic Therapy Increases Bleeding Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease treated with the combination of rivaroxaban and aspirin face a greater risk for bleeding versus patients treated with aspirin alone, according to a study published in the Sept. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Optimized AED Placement Might Improve Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Optimized placement of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) could increase out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) coverage over real AED placements, according to an in silico study published in the Sept. 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Aspirin for Primary Prevention May Offer Net Benefit for Some

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is likely to result in net benefit for some patients, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Remote, Postpartum BP Checks Feasible in Women With HTN

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A remote blood pressure monitoring program is feasible and acceptable to postpartum women with hypertension, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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ED Openings, Closures May Affect Tx, Outcomes for Acute MI

MONDAY, Sept. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High-occupancy hospitals may be sensitive to openings and closures in neighboring emergency departments, according to a study published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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MCI Linked to Lower Use of Cardiac Catheterization in AMI

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Preexisting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is associated with a lower use of cardiac catheterization and coronary revascularization after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a study published online Aug. 13 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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CDC Revises Number of Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses to 380

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials have revised downward the number of cases of severe lung injury linked to vaping, from more than 450 cases cited last week to the total of 380 cases announced late Thursday.

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Prevalence of Apnea High in Individuals With Resistant HTN

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with resistant hypertension (RH) have a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), with a dose-response association observed between the severity of OSA and blood pressure (BP) values, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Lifetime Risks for Peripheral Artery Disease Higher for Blacks

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The lifetime risks for peripheral artery disease (PAD) are higher in black men and women than in whites or Hispanics, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Women With Heart Attack Do Present With Typical Symptoms

FRIDAY, Sept. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Typical symptoms of myocardial infarction are more common and have greater predictive value in women than in men, according to a study published in the Sept. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Nine States Now Have an Obesity Rate Above 35 Percent

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The number of U.S. states with adult obesity rates above 35 percent reached an all-time high of nine in 2018, according to the Trust for America's Health, the nonprofit group behind the 16th annual "State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America" report.

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HIV Infection May Raise Risk for Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- HIV infection is independently associated with an increased risk for atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a research letter published in the Sept. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Imaging Technique May Help Predict Stroke-Related Dementia

THURSDAY, Sept. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Diffusion tensor image segmentation technique (DSEG), which characterizes microstructural damage across the cerebellum, identifies damage in cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) and can predict dementia, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Stroke.

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EPA to Phase Out Chemical Testing on Mammals

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The eventual elimination of chemical testing on mammals was announced Tuesday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The New York Times Article
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Spending Up With Treatment in Hospital-Owned Practices

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Financial integration between physicians and hospitals raises patient spending but does not impact care quality, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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New Tool Measures Patients' Perceptions of Stroke Care

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The STROKE Perception Report is a valid and reliable measure of patients' and family surrogates' perceptions of the quality of acute stroke hospital services, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing.

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Poverty Rate Drops, but Fewer Americans Have Health Insurance

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of Americans living in poverty declined in 2018, but the rate of those without health insurance increased, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report.

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Occasional Napping Linked to Lower Risk for Cardiovascular Events

TUESDAY, Sept. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Napping once or twice per week is associated with a lower risk for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Heart.

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Retinal Vein Occlusion Linked to Higher Risk for CV Events

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality, according to a review published in the September issue of Retina.

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Studies Look at E-Cigarette Use Linked to Pulmonary Illness

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarette use has been associated with severe pulmonary illness, according to three studies published online Sept. 6 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report and the New England Journal of Medicine.

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1970 to 2010 Saw Large Jump in Hypertension During Pregnancy

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, 0.63 percent of women experience chronic hypertension during pregnancy, with the rate increasing with maternal age and year of delivery, according to a study published online Sept. 9 in Hypertension.

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T2DM Risk Reduced by 75 Percent With Healthiest Lifestyle

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with the healthiest lifestyle have a 75 percent reduced risk for type 2 diabetes, and those with diabetes have a lower risk for mortality, according to a review published online Sept. 4 in Diabetologia.

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World Trade Center Site Exposure Linked to Lasting CVD Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Greater exposure to the World Trade Center (WTC) site is associated with increased long-term cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in JAMA Network Open.

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County-Level Poverty Strongly Tied to Heart Failure Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- County-level poverty is strongly associated with heart failure and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality, and the correlation is stronger for heart failure mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Study Reveals Mixed Effects on Health for Vegetarian Diet

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vegetarians and fish eaters have a lower risk for ischemic heart disease compared with meat eaters, and vegetarians have a higher risk for stroke, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in The BMJ.

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Racial, Ethnic Underrepresentation Found in Med School Matriculants

FRIDAY, Sept. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among medical school matriculants, black, Hispanic, and American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) students are underrepresented, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Network Open.

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Majority of U.S. Doctors Believe ACA Has Improved Access to Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sixty percent of U.S. physicians believe that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has improved access to care and insurance after five years of implementation, according to a report published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Drinking Soft Drinks Tied to Higher Risk for Early Death

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Greater consumption of soft drinks, both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened, is associated with a higher risk for all-cause mortality, according to a European study published online Sept. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Low-Fat Dietary Pattern Offers Long-Term Health Benefits

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A low-fat dietary pattern provides lasting health benefits, according to a study published in the September issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

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Higher Risk for Noncommunicable Diseases Seen in Cerebral Palsy

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with cerebral palsy (CP) have an increased risk for noncommunicable disease, particularly cardiovascular and respiratory disease, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Neurology.

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In STEMI, Biodegradable Polymer Sirolimus-Eluting Stents Superior

TUESDAY, Sept. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), there were fewer target lesion failures at one year in those receiving biodegradable polymer sirolimus-eluting stents versus durable polymer everolimus-eluting stents, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in The Lancet. The research was published to coincide with the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2019, held from Aug. 31 to Sept. 4 in Paris.

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