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Attitude Toward Plastic Surgery Remains Positive During COVID-19

Recommendations such as enhanced safety protocols developed for resuming elective procedures

MONDAY, June 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Americans have a positive attitude toward plastic surgery in the COVID-19 period, and recommendations have been issued for resuming elective procedures, according to a press release issued by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

The ASPS surveyed Americans' perceptions of plastic surgery in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and examined responses from more than 1,000 consumers. During the pandemic, 49 percent of those who had not had plastic surgery indicated being open to cosmetic or reconstructive surgery in the future. Twenty-eight percent of these respondents would consider a first-time cosmetic procedure. Improved overall confidence was reported by those who had previous procedures, and 29 percent of respondents indicated they were interested in specific treatments.

As interest persists in plastic surgery, members of the ASPS developed recommendations for reopening strategies. These recommendations include knowing the up-to-date COVID-19 statistics in the community; reviewing patient flow plans to facilitate social distancing; having available COVID-19 testing; reassessing cleaning and sterilization protocols; assessing access to anesthesia supplies and personal protective equipment; spending time to educate staff; and being aware of the availability of transfer options. Patients should expect enhanced safety protocols, including telehealth/virtual encounters in place of in-person visits; assessment of which services will be available upon opening and which will be delayed; use of online patient portals and other methods of completing paperwork; on-site screening; and mask wearing and staggered scheduling.

"Our goal at ASPS is to keep our finger on the pulse of the public and plastic surgeons for all information and questions pertaining to cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery," Lynn Jeffers, M.D., president of the ASPS, said in a statement.

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