September 2018 Briefing - Emergency Medicine

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Emergency Medicine for September 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Physicians Often Don't Address Their Burnout

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of physicians experience burnout, and many do not seek treatment for burnout, according to a report published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire.

More Information

Prevalence of TBI 2.5 Percent Among U.S. Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is 2.5 percent among U.S. children, and TBI is associated with several health conditions, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Business Degree Increasingly Useful for Doctors

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Having a Master of Business Administration degree (M.B.A.) can help doctors with important, practice-related decisions, according to a report published recently in Physician Practice.

Abstract/Full Text

80,000 Americans Died From Influenza Over Last Year

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza was deadlier last season than it has been for at least four decades, killing 80,000 Americans. So said the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention late Tuesday in an interview with the Associated Press.

AP News Article

Opioid Bill Gets Bipartisan Support

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a rare bipartisan move, both the House and Senate have reached a compromise on legislation to address the opioid epidemic.

The New York Times Article

Final Update on Salmonella-Tainted Honey Smacks Cereal

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A total of 135 people across 36 states fell ill with Salmonella after eating Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal, according to a final update from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Time to Defib Not Linked to Survival in Pediatric IHCA

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), time to first defibrillation attempt is not associated with survival, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Network Open.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Practices Should Set Rules for Staff Social Media Use

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medical practices can take steps to avoid problems related to use of social media by staff members, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Burnout, Career Choice Regret Prevalent in U.S. Residents

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of burnout and career choice regret are prevalent among U.S. resident physicians, according to a study published in the Sept. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Lawn-Mower-Related Injuries Are Most Often Lacerations

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2006 through 2013, the weighted estimate of lawn-mower-related injuries was 51,151, with the most common injuries being lacerations, fractures, and amputations, according to a study published online Aug. 1 in Public Health Reports.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Head CT Decision Aid Ups Parent Knowledge in Child Head Trauma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a decision aid can improve parent knowledge for children with minor head injury at intermediate risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI), according to a study published online Sept. 21 in JAMA Network Open.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Initial Abx Feasible Alternative for Uncomplicated Appendicitis

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The cumulative incidence of appendicitis recurrence within five years is 39.1 percent among patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis initially treated with antibiotics, according to research published in the Sept. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

In 2016, Proportion of Uninsured Americans Down to 10 Percent

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2013 to 2016 there was a reduction in uninsurance among Americans from 17 to 10 percent, according to a report published in September by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Urban Institute.

More Information

Physician-Group ACOs Generate Medicare Savings

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physician-group accountable care organizations (ACOs) participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) generated significantly more savings for Medicare that grew from 2012 to 2015 compared with hospital-integrated ACOs, according to research published in the Sept. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Interpreter Services Critical for Emergency Care

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department interpreters are vital to quality care, according to an article published in the October issue of the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gender Nonconformity Linked to Students' Mental Distress

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Gender nonconformity (GNC) is associated with mental distress for female and male students, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mortality for Unintentional Drug Poisonings Up Since 1979

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Since at least 1979, there has been an exponential increase in the overall mortality rate for unintentional drug poisonings, according to a research article published online Sept. 21 in Science.

Abstract/Full Text

Heart Failure Patients Enrolled in Hospice Use Less Health Care

MONDAY, Sept. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced heart failure enrolled in hospice have fewer emergency department visits, hospital days, and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, according to a study published in the September issue of JACC: Heart Failure.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ground Beef Recalled After E. Coli Outbreak

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than 132,000 pounds of ground beef have been recalled by a Colorado company following a suspected outbreak where one person was killed and 17 were sickened by Escherichia coli after eating the meat.

AP News Article
Cargill Statement

Dozens of Medical Groups Join Forces to Improve Diagnoses

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Every nine minutes, a patient in a U.S. hospital dies because a diagnosis was wrong or delayed -- resulting in 80,000 deaths a year. That sobering estimate comes from the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (SIDM).

More Information

Repeat CT Common in Peds Traumatic Epidural Hematoma

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For children with traumatic epidural hematomas (EDHs), repeated computed tomography (CT) imaging is common, but rarely impacts management, according to a study published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Hurt, Killed in Shootings With Semiautomatic Rifles

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More people are wounded and killed in active shooter incidents in which semiautomatic rifles are used, according to a research letter published in the Sept. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Research Links Doctor Burnout to Patient Safety Incidents

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physician burnout is associated with increased risk of patient safety incidents, poorer quality of care due to low professionalism, and reduced patient satisfaction, according to a review published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Black Individuals at Highest Risk of Legal Intervention Injury

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Black males were at the highest risk of legal intervention injury per capita from 2005 to 2015, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in JAMA Network Open.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Hospitals Charge 479 Percent of Cost of Drugs on Average

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- On average, hospitals mark up drugs by 479 percent of their cost, according to a report from The Moran Company, commissioned by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

More Information

Residents Should Take Advantage of Paid Time Off

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Although there are many demands on residents, taking advantage of paid vacation time is one of the perks and should be maximized, according to an article published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire.

More Information

20% of Children, Adolescents Use Prescription Medications

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 20 percent of children and adolescents used prescription medications in 2013 to 2014, and 8.2 percent of concurrent users of prescription medications in 2009 to 2014 were at risk for a potentially major drug-drug interactions (DDIs), according to a study published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Patient Health Information Often Shared Electronically

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The most common electronically sent and received types of patient health information (PHI) include laboratory results and medication lists, according to a report published Aug. 15 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

Opioid Deaths 1999 to 2015 May Be Dramatically Underestimated

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- States may be greatly underestimating the effect of opioid-related overdose deaths because of incomplete cause-of-death reporting, according to a study recently published in Public Health Reports.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Global Prevalence of Insufficient Activity 27.5 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In 2016 the age-standardized prevalence of insufficient physical activity was 27.5 percent, according to a study published in the October issue of The Lancet Global Health.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

U.S. Senate Passes Opioids Bill

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Senate on Monday passed on a 99-1 vote legislation aimed at curbing the nation's ongoing opioid addiction crisis.

CBS News Article

Scribes Improve Physician Workflow, Patient Interaction

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Use of medical scribes is associated with decreased physician documentation burden, improved work efficiency, and improved patient interactions, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Drug Prices Increase More Than Expected After Shortages

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Prices for drugs under shortage increase more than twice as quickly as expected in the absence of a shortage, according to a research letter published online Sept. 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Compliance With Requirement to Report Results on EUCTR Is Poor

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Half of trials on the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) are non-compliant with the European Commission's requirement that all trials post results to the registry within 12 month of completion, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in The BMJ.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Decrease in Infant Walker-Related Injuries Since 2010

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Following implementation of a federal mandatory safety standard on infant walkers in 2010, there was a decrease in the number of infant walker-related injuries, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text

Mercury in Traditional Tibetan Medicine Could Be Harmful

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The high mercury (Hg) concentration contained in traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) could be harmful to humans and contribute to the environmental Hg burden in Tibet, according to a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of Environmental Science & Technology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Association Health Plans Can Help Small Businesses Offer Coverage

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Association health plans (AHPs) will provide small businesses with more choices, access, and coverage options, although critics warn that they may undermine the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace, according to an article published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

More Information

Ambient Particulate Matter Linked to Emergency Asthma Care

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Ambient particulate matter concentrations are associated with emergency/urgent care visits among individuals with asthma, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Final CDC Update on Salmonella Linked to Backyard Poultry

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- At least 334 people in 47 states have been sickened in Salmonella outbreaks linked to contact with live poultry in backyard flocks, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

CDC: Some Sexual Minorities Have Higher Sexual Risk Behaviors

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Bisexual females and "not sure" male students report higher prevalences for many sexual risk behaviors than heterosexual students, according to research published in the Sept. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Extreme Flooding Can Up Exposure to Pathogens

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Extreme flooding, such as was seen in Hurricane Harvey, can increase exposure to pathogens, according to a research letter published recently in Environmental Science & Technology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Situation Framing, Language Can Influence Decision-Making

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- How a situation is framed and the language used to describe risks can influence patients' decision-making, according to an article published in Physicians Practice.

More Information

Firearm Deaths Up Globally From 1990 to 2016

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Firearm deaths increased globally between 1990 and 2016, according to a study published in the Aug. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Risk Score Promising for Predicting MI, Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A score based on the results of three laboratory tests has higher sensitivity and specificity than cardiac troponin alone for stratifying patients presenting with suspected acute coronary syndrome, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text

Physicians Need Training for Mass Casualty Incidents

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Proper training and post-incident steps can help lessen the secondary trauma health professionals experience providing care during mass casualty incidents (MCIs), according to an article published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire.

More Information

AHA: Resistant Hypertension Diagnosis, Tx Guidelines Updated

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A correct diagnosis of resistant hypertension is necessary to avoid overmedicating, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association published online Sept. 13 in Hypertension.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gains in Insurance Coverage Seen for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Adults

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults report continued problems affording care despite coverage gains offered by the Affordable Care Act, according to a study published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Highest Opioid-Related Mortality Seen in Construction Jobs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Proportional mortality ratios (PMRs) for heroin-related overdose deaths and methadone-related overdose deaths from 2007 to 2012 were highest among construction workers, according to research published in the Aug. 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Residents Working Long Hours Can Increase Alertness

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medical residents can take steps to maintain their energy and alertness during long shifts, according to an article published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire.

More Information

Six-Step Analysis Can Help Improve Practice Logistics

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A six-step analysis can help redesign and improve the outpatient health care process, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract/Full Text

Chest Radiograph Effective for Excluding Pediatric Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A negative chest radiograph (CXR) accurately excludes pneumonia in the majority of children, according to a study published in the September issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

One in Five Pot Products Fails Potency, Purity Tests in California

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Close to 20 percent of marijuana products in California have failed to pass tests for potency or purity since the state began mandating such testing July 1, a new report finds.

AP News Article

Tai Chi Effective at Reducing Number of Falls in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi is more effective than conventional exercise at preventing falls among high-risk, older adults, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Shift Seen From EDs to Urgent Care for Low-Acuity, Acute Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From 2008 through 2015, there was a substantial shift in venue in which acute care for low-acuity conditions was sought, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Medicaid Work Requirements Don't Impact Many Enrollees

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Medicaid work requirements will only impact a small proportion of persons and may only generate minimal savings, according to two research letters published online Sept. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text - Goldman
Abstract/Full Text - Silvestri
Editorial

Data Age in Clinical Trials Is About Three Years at Publication

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The median data age in clinical trials in journals with a high impact factor is about three years at publication, according to a study published in the Aug. 10 issue of JAMA Network Open.

Abstract/Full Text

Many Opportunities for Doctors Using Twitter

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors can use Twitter to build networks and learn more about research in real time, according to a blog post published by Penn Medicine News.

More Information

Nurse-Led Call After Discharge Doesn't Cut Peds Urgent Care

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A one-time nurse-led telephone call does not decrease the 30-day reutilization rate of urgent health care services in children discharged from the hospital, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 issue of JAMA: Pediatrics.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Naloxone Rarely Administered by Layperson in Opioid Deaths

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- From July 2016 to June 2017, bystanders were documented in 44 percent of opioid overdose deaths, but naloxone was rarely administered by a layperson, according to a study published Aug. 31 in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Docs, Consumers Agree on Benefits of Virtual Care

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians and consumers agree on the benefits of virtual care, but physician adoption of virtual care technologies is low, according to a report on the Deloitte 2018 Survey of U.S. Physicians.

More Information

Physician Burnout Rates Vary by Medical Specialty

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of physicians report being burned out, but rates vary substantially by medical specialty, according to an article published in AMA Wire.

More Information

Influenza Caused Emirates Flight to Be Briefly Quarantined at JFK

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The mysterious illness that kept a plane away from the terminal after some passengers reported feeling sick has been confirmed as the flu, according to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

AP News Article

With New Persistent Opioid Use, Most Early Scripts From Surgeons

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Among surgical patients who develop new persistent opioid use, surgeons provide the majority of opioid prescriptions in the first few months after surgery, but by nine to 12 months post-surgery, most prescriptions are from primary care providers, according to a study recently published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Greater CAD Incidence, Heart Mass in Firefighter Cardiac Arrests

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most cardiac fatalities among firefighters have evidence of coronary heart disease and increased heart mass, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract/Full Text

X-Rays, Blood Tests Not Advised for Children's Concussions

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Routine X-rays and blood tests should not be used to diagnose children's concussions, new U.S. government guidelines say. The guidelines were published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Pediatrics.

CDC Guideline
Evidence Review (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
CDC Press Release

Personalized Weighting Could Enhance Hospital Rating Tools

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The weighting systems that underlie hospital performance rating tools should incorporate the needs, values, and preferences of patients, according to a perspective article published in the Aug. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Better Training Needed to Boost LGBTQ Patient Health Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- High-quality health care needs to be provided to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) patients, and improved training is necessary to deliver that care, according to a report published in the American Medical Association's AMA Wire.

More Information

Opioid Maker to Pay for Overdose Antidote Development

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A $3.4 million grant to help a non-profit company develop a less expensive opioid overdose antidote was announced by Purdue Pharma, which makes the opioid painkiller OxyContin.

AP News Article
Purdue Pharma News Release

Hospital Groups Launch Own Generic Drug Company

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Three U.S. health care foundations and seven hospital groups have formed a generic drug company to combat high prices and chronic shortages of medicines.

AP News Article

Widespread Statin Use Not Recommended in Old, Very Old

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use is not associated with reduced risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) or all-cause mortality among older adults without type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in The BMJ.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

CDC Issues Recs on Diagnosis, Management of Pediatric mTBI

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has established an evidence-based guideline for diagnosis and management of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The guideline was published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Pediatrics.

CDC Guideline
Evidence Review (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Baloxavir Superior to Placebo for Alleviating Flu Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The selective inhibitor of influenza cap-dependent endonuclease, baloxavir marboxil, is superior to placebo for alleviating influenza symptoms, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

130 Now Sickened by Salmonella-Tainted Honey Smacks Cereal

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- One hundred thirty people across 36 states have now fallen ill with Salmonella after eating Kellogg's Honey Smacks cereal, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

FDA Outbreak Alert
CDC Press Release

ED Plays Critical Role in Caring for Patients With Opioid Use Disorder

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department providers need evidence-based strategies to identify and manage patients with opioid use disorder, according to a review published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

~3,000 Excess Deaths Estimated Due to Hurricane Maria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The total excess mortality attributed to Hurricane Maria is estimated at 2,975 deaths, according to a report issued by George Washington University.

More Information

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program Has Uncertain Future

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Uncertainty surrounds the future of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, according to an Ideas and Opinions article published online Aug. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Enrollment in High-Deductible Health Plans Up From '07 to '17

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Enrollment in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) has increased among adults with employment-based insurance coverage, according to an August data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

CDC: Increase in Rate of STDs for Fourth Consecutive Year in U.S.

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis were diagnosed in the United States in 2017, marking a fourth consecutive year of sharp increases in these sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Last Updated: