February 2019 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for February 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Single-Application FIT Moderately Sensitive, Specific for CRC

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Single-application fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) have moderate-to-high sensitivity and specificity for colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a review published online Feb. 26 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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2014 to 2017 Saw Improvement in Burnout for U.S. Physicians

MONDAY, Feb. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 2014 to 2017, there was an improvement in burnout and satisfaction with work-life integration among U.S. physicians, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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National Health Spending Set to Increase 5.5 Percent Annually

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- National health spending is projected to increase at an annual rate of 5.5. percent from 2018 to 2027, with fundamental economic and demographic factors the main drivers, according to a report published online Feb. 20 in Health Affairs.

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Most Patients Do Not Disclose Complementary Medicine Use

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Just one-third of users of biologically based complementary medicine (CM) disclose their use to traditional health care providers, according to a review published online Feb. 7 in Scientific Reports.

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Cholecystectomy in Pregnancy Tied to Worse Outcomes

FRIDAY, Feb. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo cholecystectomy during the third trimester of pregnancy experience worse outcomes than women who wait until after delivery, according to a study published online Feb. 12 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Vertical Integration Has Little Impact on Quality Measures

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vertical integration between hospitals and physicians has little impact on quality measures, while increased hospital market concentration is strongly associated with reduced quality in measures of patient satisfaction, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Medical Care Research and Review.

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Many Experience Improvement in Sex Life After Bariatric Surgery

THURSDAY, Feb. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- About half of women and men who report some level of dissatisfaction with their sexual life prior to bariatric surgery experience clinically meaningful improvement during five years of follow-up, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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New Kaiser Permanente Medical School Plans to Waive Tuition

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A new medical school to be opened by California-based health system Kaiser Permanente will waive tuition for all students in its first five graduating classes.

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Altered Gut Microbiome Seen in Patients With Active Lupus

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The microbiome of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), particularly those with increased disease activity, has reduced taxonomic complexity, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Black-White Cancer Mortality Gap Decreasing in Some Age Groups

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 20, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer death rates are decreasing faster in blacks than whites in the United States, according to a report published online Feb. 14 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Hospital Prices Growing Faster Than Physician Prices

FRIDAY, Feb. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Growth in hospital prices and payments outpaced growth in physician prices and payments from 2007 through 2014, according to a report published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Child Enterovirus Infection May Up Risk for Developing Celiac Disease

THURSDAY, Feb. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A higher frequency of enterovirus infections in early childhood is associated with an increased risk for developing celiac disease, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the The BMJ.

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Improved Outcomes Seen With Liver Grafts From Older Donors

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2016, liver graft loss and mortality improved among recipients of liver grafts from older donors, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in JAMA Surgery.

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Health Care Spending Per Person Increased to $5,641 in 2017

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In 2017, health care spending per person reached $5,641, according to the Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI) annual Health Care Cost and Utilization Report.

Health Care Cost and Utilization Report

Many Systematic Reviews Do Not Fully Report Adverse Events

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many systematic review protocols in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO) do not include adverse event reporting, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.

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Direct-Acting Antivirals Cut Mortality in Chronic Hepatitis C

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, direct-acting antivirals are associated with a reduced risk for mortality and hepatocellular carcinoma, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in The Lancet.

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Aspirin Underused for Advanced Colorectal Polyps

TUESDAY, Feb. 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin is underused to reduce the risk for colorectal cancer among patients with advanced colorectal polyps, according to a study recently published in The American Journal of Medicine.

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Johnson & Johnson to Provide Drug Prices in TV Ads

FRIDAY, Feb. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a drug industry first, Johnson & Johnson will start giving the list prices of its prescription drugs in television ads.

AP News Article

T2DM Initially Remits in Majority Who Undergo Gastric Bypass

THURSDAY, Feb. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is associated with high levels of type 2 diabetes remission at one year, although 27 percent relapse after five years, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Diabetologia.

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Gastric Bypass May Aid Muscle Strength, Physical Performance

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Relative muscle strength and physical function improve meaningfully after gastric bypass, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Hepatitis C Infection Rates Up After OxyContin Reformulation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- States with above-median OxyContin misuse before reformulation of the drug experienced a 222 percent increase in hepatitis C infection rates after reformulation, according to a report published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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USPSTF Still Recommends Against Pancreatic Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Feb. 5 by the USPSTF.

Draft Recommendation Statement
Draft Evidence Review
Comment on Recommendation Statement

8 Questions Helpful for Assessing IBD in Primary Care

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The CalproQuest, an eight-item questionnaire, is a feasible instrument for assessing patients for inflammatory bowel disease in primary care settings, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Evidence of Therapeutic Efficacy Substantial for Cannabis Use

TUESDAY, Feb. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most qualifying conditions for which patients are licensed to use cannabis medically have substantial or conclusive evidence of therapeutic efficacy, according to a report published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Some Obesity-Related Cancers Increasing in Younger Adults

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of some obesity-related cancers is increasing in younger generations, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in The Lancet Public Health.

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Sponge Cytology-Sampling Device Promising for Barrett Esophagus Dx

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A swallowable cellular retrieval capsule sponge cytology-sampling device, EsophaCap, in combination with a methylation biomarker panel represents a promising strategy for diagnosing Barrett esophagus (BE), according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Frailty Tied to Liver Transplant Wait-List Mortality in Cirrhosis

MONDAY, Feb. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cirrhosis, frailty is more frequently observed in those with ascites or hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and is independently associated with liver transplant wait-list mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Gastroenterology.

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Pharmacist-Led Phone Follow-Up May Cut Readmission Rates

FRIDAY, Feb. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A pharmacist-led, postdischarge structured telephone follow-up (TFU) intervention can reduce 30-day and 90-day readmission rates for polypharmacy patients, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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