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January 2020 Briefing - Neurology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for January 2020. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Road Proximity Linked to Incidence of Neurologic Diseases

FRIDAY, Jan. 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Road proximity is associated with an increased incidence of specific neurologic disorders, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Environmental Health.

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Early Treatment Tied to Less Disability With Pediatric-Onset MS

FRIDAY, Jan. 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Timing of treatment start is an important predictor of disability accumulation in patients with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders.

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Girls May Receive First Autism Diagnosis Later Than Boys

FRIDAY, Jan. 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Among people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), girls often receive a first diagnosis of autism later than boys, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Autism Research.

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2017 to 2018 Saw Increase in Life Expectancy in the United States

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2017 to 2018, there was an increase in life expectancy in the United States and a decrease in age-adjusted death rates, according to a January data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics.

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Comorbidities Tied to Higher Rates of All-Cause Admissions in MS Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Comorbidities increase the rate of all-cause, but not multiple sclerosis (MS)-specific, hospital admissions among patients with MS, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders.

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U.S. Spends More on Health Care, but Has Worse Life Expectancy

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The United States spends substantially more than any other wealthy nation on health care, yet it has a lower life expectancy and a higher suicide rate than other wealthy nations, according to a January data brief released by the Commonwealth Fund.

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Dietary Flavonols May Reduce Risk for Alzheimer Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Higher dietary intake of flavonols seems to be associated with a reduced risk for incident Alzheimer dementia, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Neurology.

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Speech Analysis May Help Track Changes in Mental Health State

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A system for collecting speech samples from people with serious mental illness can be used to track changes in their clinical states over time, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in PLOS ONE.

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Suvorexant May Improve Insomnia With Alzheimer Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Suvorexant improves total sleep time (TST) in patients with probable Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia and insomnia, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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Gender Gap Persists in Starting Salary for Physicians

TUESDAY, Jan. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The gender gap in starting salary for physicians persists, although it is unclear which factors account for this gap, according to a report published online Jan. 22 in Health Affairs.

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Racial Disparities Noted in Quality of Care for Dementia

TUESDAY, Jan. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Asian patients with dementia seem not to be receiving the same quality of care as white patients, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Clinical Epidemiology.

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Wealthy Pay Most to Finance U.S. Health Care

MONDAY, Jan. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Health care payments in the United States are more regressive than previously thought, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in Health Services Research.

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Health Care Utilization Up for Seniors With Untreated Apnea

FRIDAY, Jan. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Older adult Medicare beneficiaries with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have increased health care utilization (HCU) and costs, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

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Prenatal Surgery Yields Lasting Benefits for Myelomeningocele

FRIDAY, Jan. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For myelomeningocele, prenatal surgery does not improve adaptive behavior but is associated with improved mobility and independent functioning in school-aged children, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Major Insurers Offer $55 Million to Lower Generic Drug Costs

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A nonprofit that develops and sells cheaper drugs will receive a $55 million investment from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and associated organizations to create cheaper versions of expensive generic drugs.

The New York Times Article

Supratentorial ICH Outcomes Better in Young Blacks, Hispanics

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For young adults with supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), functional outcomes are improved with black and Hispanic versus white race/ethnicity, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Neurology.

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Fewer Than Half of Clinical Trials Comply With Reporting Laws

THURSDAY, Jan. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 is low, with only 40.9 percent of trials reporting results within one year, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in The Lancet.

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Fast-Track Review of ACA Lawsuit Rejected by U.S. Supreme Court

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A fast-track review of a lawsuit that threatens the Affordable Care Act was rejected Tuesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.

AP News Article

ACP: Medicare for All Needed to Fix 'Ill' U.S. Health Care System

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Physicians (ACP) says the U.S. health care system "is ill and needs a bold new prescription" that includes coverage for all Americans and lower costs.

AP News Article
American College of Physicians

Primary Care Screening for Dementia Not Harmful

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- No harms come from screening for Alzheimer disease and related dementias (ADRDs) in primary care, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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New Guidance Issued for Care of Children With Williams Syndrome

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In an American Academy of Pediatrics clinical report, published online Jan. 21 in Pediatrics, recommendations are presented for the management of patients with Williams syndrome (WS).

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Americans Lack Knowledge About Eye Health

FRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Americans' lack of knowledge about eye health may put their vision at risk, according to a survey released by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Press Release

Acute Flaccid Myelitis Features Differ in Peak, Nonpeak Years

FRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) cases differ in peak and nonpeak years, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Emerging Infectious Diseases, a publication of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Longer External Ventricular Drain Closures Needed to Read ICP

FRIDAY, Jan. 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Most external ventricular drain (EVD) closures performed in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage last less than one minute, and intracranial pressure (ICP) equilibrium is not reached to allow accurate measurement of ICP before the drain is reopened, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of Neuroscience Nursing.

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Single-Payer System Would Likely Save Money

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There is near consensus across 30 years of economic analysis of single-payer plans that a single-payer system would reduce health expenditures in the United States, according to a review published online Jan. 15 in PLOS Medicine.

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ACA Tied to Narrowing of Disparities in Access to Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The Affordable Care Act has reduced disparities in access to health care among black, Hispanic, and white adults, according to a January data brief released by the Commonwealth Fund.

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Ageism Predicts Significantly Worse Health Outcomes

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Ageism predicts significantly worse health outcomes, according to a review published online Jan. 15 in PLOS ONE.

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High-Dose Erythropoietin No Benefit for Extreme Preemies

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For extremely preterm infants, high-dose erythropoietin treatment from 24 hours after birth does not result in a reduced risk for severe neurodevelopmental impairment or death at age 2 years, according to a study published in the Jan. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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2011 to 2017 Saw Increase in Spending on DMTs for MS

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2011 to 2017, there was an increase in gross annual expenditures on multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), with increased spending mainly driven by increases in per-prescription costs, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Neurology.

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Maternal Distress May Affect Brain Development in Fetuses With CHD

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological distress, including stress, anxiety, and depression, is prevalent among women carrying fetuses with congenital heart disease (CHD), and this distress can affect fetal neurological development, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Enterovirus A71 Outbreak in Children ID'd in Colorado Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In an observational cohort study recently published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, details are presented for an outbreak of enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) neurological disease in children who presented to a Colorado hospital for treatment.

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Evolution of Approval, Regulation Processes for Drugs Explored

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. approval and regulation processes for pharmaceutical agents have evolved during the last four decades, according to a study published in the Jan. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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2001 to 2016 Saw Drop, Stall in IQ Losses From Chemicals

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2016, there was a decrease or stagnation in IQ losses from exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), methylmercury, and lead, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology.

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One in Four Children With Autism Not Formally Diagnosed

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) remains underdiagnosed in black and Hispanic children, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in Autism Research.

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Doctor Replacement Ratios Higher in Largest, Hospital-Owned Practices

TUESDAY, Jan. 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2009 to 2016, more physicians entering the Medicare program worked at large group or hospital-owned practices than small group or independent practices, according to a research letter published online Jan. 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physicians Spend >16 Minutes Per Encounter on EHR Use

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians spend a considerable amount of time using electronic health records (EHRs) to support care delivery, with wide variation seen in the distribution of time within specialty, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Intensive Systolic BP Control May Not Benefit All Older Adults

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) control lowers the risk for major cardiovascular events, cognitive impairment, and death in older adults; however, these benefits may not extend to older adults with lower baseline cognitive function, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Burnout in Med Students Tied to Perceived Stress, Phone Behavior

MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of perceived stress, poorer sleep quality, and smartphone addiction contribute to burnout in osteopathic medical students, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

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California May Start Producing Its Own Medicines

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A proposal for California to contract generic drug companies to make medications would make the state the first in the country to produce its own medications.

AP News Article

Recruitment Satisfactory for Foreign-Educated Health Providers

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Foreign-educated health professionals (FEHPs) in the United States are overall satisfied with their recruitment experience, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

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Neural Tube Defect Prevalence 7.0 Per 10,000 in HIV-Exposed

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs) is 7.0 per 10,000 live births in HIV-exposed pregnancies, which is similar to the prevalence in the general population, according to research published in the Jan. 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Neighborhood Disadvantage Impacts Hospital Quality Ratings

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals caring for neighborhoods with high levels of disadvantage may have lower hospital ratings due to social risk factors (SRFs) in the community, according to a study published online Dec. 30 in Medical Care.

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Clinical Guidelines Developed for Managing Nosebleeds

THURSDAY, Jan. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, published online Jan. 7 in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, recommendations are presented for the management of nosebleeds.

Clinical Practice Guideline
Executive Summary

Antipsychotic Initiation Ups Risk for Head Injury, TBI in Alzheimer Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD) initiating antipsychotics have an increased risk for head injuries and traumatic brain injury (TBI), according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Rate of Electronic Scooter Injuries Increased From 2014 to 2018

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- From 2014 to 2018, there was an increase in the incidence of electronic scooter (e-scooter) injuries and associated hospital admissions, according to a research letter published online Jan. 8 in JAMA Surgery.

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Large Gap Found in Health Administrative Spending for U.S., Canada

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There is a large and widening gap in health administrative spending between the United States and Canada, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Active Lifestyle May Slow Familial Frontotemporal Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A physically and mentally active lifestyle may protect against frontotemporal dementia even in people at established genetic risk, according to a study published in the January issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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Cancer Mortality Continuing to Drop, With Lung Cancer a Driver

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer mortality is continuing to decline, driven by progress in lung cancer, although mortality reductions have slowed or stopped for some cancers, according to findings included in Cancer Statistics, 2020, the American Cancer Society's latest annual report on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. The report was published online Jan. 8 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Cancer Statistics, 2020

In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes Similar for Dialysis, Nondialysis Patients

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA), survival outcomes are similar for those on maintenance dialysis and nondialysis patients, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Early Treatment Tied to Faster Concussion Recovery

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Earlier initiation of clinical care is associated with faster recovery after concussion, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in JAMA Neurology.

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Odds of Stroke Up With Dual Use of E-Cigarettes, Cigarettes

TUESDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Dual use of electronic cigarettes and combustible cigarettes is associated with increased odds of stroke compared with not smoking or sole combustible cigarette use, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Laser-Based Imaging + AI May Diagnose Brain Tumors in OR

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A novel workflow that combines advanced optical imaging with an artificial intelligence algorithm may accurately diagnose brain tumors in real time in the operating room, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Nature Medicine.

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Price Hikes for Hundreds of Medications

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. drug companies have started the new year by raising the prices of hundreds of medications.

CBS News Article

Poll: Older Adults Frequently Use Online Physician Ratings

MONDAY, Jan. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults commonly use online ratings to choose a doctor, according to a report published online Jan. 6 based on the results of the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging.

National Poll on Healthy Aging

Treating Oral Disease Could Yield T2DM-Related Cost Savings

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Providing nonsurgical periodontal treatment to patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and periodontitis may significantly reduce tooth loss and diabetes-related microvascular diseases via improved glycemic control, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Severe Hypoglycemia in Seniors With T1DM May Worsen Cognition

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Both recent severe hypoglycemia (SH) and lifetime SH are associated with worse cognition among older adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Peripheral Nervous System Events Not Common in Lupus

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is a component of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and has a significant negative impact on health-related quality of life, according to a study published in the January issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Linked to Gray Matter Volume

FRIDAY, Jan. 3, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is positively associated with gray matter (GM) volume and total brain volume and with GM volume in specific brain areas, according to a study published in the January issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Tau-PET Signal Predicts Atrophy in Early Alzheimer Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The global intensity of the tau-positron emission tomography (PET) signal predicts the rate of subsequent atrophy in patients at early symptomatic Alzheimer disease (AD) stages, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Patient Experiences Modestly Worse After Hospital Acquisition

THURSDAY, Jan. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Modestly worse patient experiences are seen following hospital acquisition by another hospital, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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