Rates of Depression Up in U.S. Women at Hospital to Give Birth

U.S. rate of depressive disorders recorded during delivery hospitalization increased from 2000 to 2015

TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 2000 to 2015, the rates of depressive disorders recorded for women during delivery hospitalization increased nationally, according to a study published online May 9 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Sarah C. Haight, M.P.H., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues analyzed data from the National Inpatient Sample and 31 publicly available State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project to describe trends in diagnoses of depressive disorders recorded for women during delivery hospitalization from 2000 to 2015.

The researchers found that from 2000 to 2015, the U.S. rate of depressive disorders recorded for women during delivery hospitalizations increased from 4.1 to 28.7 per 1,000. In 27 of the 28 states, rates increased significantly. Recent rates (2014 to 2015) were lowest in Hawaii and Nevada (<14/1,000) and highest in Vermont, Minnesota, Oregon, and Wisconsin (>49/1,000). In 2015, the highest rates were seen for those aged 35 years or older, public insurance recipients, and non-Hispanic white women (>31/1,000). Vermont and Maine had the highest annual rate increases (3.8/1,000 or greater). During 2000 to 2015, the highest annual rate increases were seen for non-Hispanic white women, those ≥35 years, and public insurance recipients (1.7/1,000 or greater).

"Findings from this first state-based analysis of rates of depressive disorders recorded during hospitalization can help states understand the overall burden of depression among women at delivery," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry; one author disclosed ties to the fertility and pregnancy industry.

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