January 2019 Briefing - Pathology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for January 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Symptom Combos Suggesting Laryngeal Cancer Identified

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- New symptom combinations that may indicate early symptoms of laryngeal cancer have been identified, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in the British Journal of General Practice.

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Lean Body Mass in Childhood Linked to Lung Function at 15

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Higher lean body mass during childhood and adolescence is associated with higher lung function at age 15 years for both sexes, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Psychopathology in Adulthood Up With Child Lead Exposure

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Higher childhood blood lead levels are associated with more psychopathology during the life course, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Improved Genetic Risk Score Aids Type 1 Diabetes Classification

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An improved type 1 diabetes (T1D) genetic risk score (GRS), the T1D GRS2, is highly useful for classifying adult incident diabetes type and improving newborn screening, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Report IDs Areas Lacking Good Practice in Health Tech Assessment

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a report published in the January issue of Value in Health, an ISPOR--The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research working group indicates the lack of good practices in three areas of health technology assessment (HTA).

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Plasma Marker Predicts Allograft Failure in Lung Transplant

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Donor-derived cell-free DNA (ddcfDNA) is a potential biomarker that can predict allograft failure after lung transplantation, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in EBioMedicine.

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BP >120/80 mm Hg Linked to Lower Gray Matter Volume

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In young adults, lower gray matter volume (GMV) is seen in individuals with blood pressure (BP) >120/80 mm Hg, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in Neurology.

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Smoking Tied to Peripheral Artery Disease in African-Americans

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking is associated with measures of subclinical peripheral artery disease (PAD) in African-Americans, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Endometrial Scratching Does Not Increase Live Birth Rate in IVF

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF), endometrial scratching by pipelle biopsy between day 3 of the cycle preceding the embryo-transfer cycle and day 3 of the embryo-transfer cycle, does not result in a higher rate of live birth, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Many New Cancer Patients Unaware of Their Hepatitis Status

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of patients with newly diagnosed cancer and concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are unaware of their viral infection at the time of cancer diagnosis, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in JAMA Oncology.

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Exome Sequencing Beneficial for Pediatric Kidney Recipients

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-exome sequencing (WES) can identify a genetic cause for almost one-third of pediatric kidney transplant recipients, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Frailty Could Increase Susceptibility for Dementia

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Frailty and Alzheimer disease-related brain changes independently contribute to dementia status, according to a study published in the February issue of The Lancet Neurology.

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FDA Down to 5 Weeks of Funding to Review New Drug Applications

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the federal government shutdown, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only about five weeks of funding left to review new drug applications, according to Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

CNN News Article

Hemochromatosis Mutation Linked to Other Morbidity

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- HFE p.C282Y homozygosity, the most common gene mutation causing hereditary hemochromatosis (type 1), is associated with other morbidity in men and women, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in The BMJ.

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Nerve Transfer Promising for Acute Flaccid Myelitis Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis and upper-extremity neuropathy who were treated with peripheral nerve transfer continue to demonstrate functional recovery at two years, according to a case series recently published in Pediatric Neurology.

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Breast Cancer Patients Do Not Overreact to Genetic Testing

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among breast cancer patients, more extensive genetic testing is not associated with increased cancer worry, according to a study recently published in JCO Precision Oncology.

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Coronary Artery Calcium May Help Predict CVD in South Asians

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence and progression of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in South Asians may be an important prognostic marker of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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High Levels of Activity, Motor Ability Linked to Better Cognition

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, higher levels of total daily activity and better motor abilities are associated with better cognition, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in Neurology.

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Adoption of Advanced Health IT Capabilities Inconsistent

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of advanced health information technology (HIT) capabilities is inconsistent across health care systems, with electronic health record (EHR) standardization being the strongest predictor of advanced capabilities, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Complications Higher Than Expected for Invasive Lung Tests

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of complications after invasive diagnostic procedures for lung abnormalities are higher in the community setting than in clinical trials, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Breakdown of Blood-Brain Barrier May Drive Dementia

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may be an early biomarker of cognitive dysfunction, independent of amyloid or tau marker status, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Medicine.

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Stem Cell Transplant Slows Progression of Multiple Sclerosis

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCST) is associated with prolonged time to disease progression compared with disease-modifying therapy (DMT), according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Congo Ebola Outbreak Now Second Worst in History

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There have been 600 confirmed cases of Ebola and 347 confirmed deaths since early August in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, making this outbreak of the disease the second largest and second deadliest in history.

ABC News Article
More Information: CDC

Study Explores Influence of Genetics, Environment in Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The influence of heritability and environmental factors has been identified for a large number of phenotypes, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Genetics.

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American College of Physicians Releases 7th Edition of Ethics Manual

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ethical principles are discussed in an updated Ethics Manual, issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published as a supplement to the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

American College of Physicians Ethics Manual
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Cardiometabolic Risk Up With Tourette, Chronic Tic Disorder

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) or chronic tic disorder (CTD) have an increased risk for developing at least one metabolic or cardiovascular disorder, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in JAMA Neurology.

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U.S. Doctor Released From Omaha Hospital After Ebola Monitoring

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An American doctor who was monitored for 21 days after possible Ebola exposure did not develop the deadly disease and has been released from the Nebraska Medicine-Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, officials say.

Press Release

Terrorist Attack Victims With PTSD Have Higher Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), those who were victims of terrorist attacks (TA) have a higher risk for neoplasms than those who experience other traumatic events (OTE), according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Journal of Neuroscience Research.

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Moderate Drinking Linked to Electroanatomic Changes in A-Fib

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower atrial voltage and conduction slowing in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Heart Rhythm.

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Median Survival for Stage 4 ALK-Positive NSCLC Nearly 7 Years

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The median overall survival (OS) from diagnosis for patients with stage IV anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 6.8 years, according to a study published online Dec. 29 in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology.

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Artificial Intelligence Can Use Routine ECGs to ID Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence (AI) can identify asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (ALVD) using results from a routine electrocardiogram (ECG), according to a research letter published online Jan. 7 in Nature Medicine.

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Prices Still Explain High U.S. Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in health spending between the United States and other countries is still explained by health care prices, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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High Fiber Intake Tied to Lower Risk for Noncommunicable Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- High intake of fiber is associated with a reduced risk for several noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), according to research published online Jan. 10 in the The Lancet.

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Algorithm Evaluates Cervical Images to ID Precancer, Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A deep learning-based visual evaluation algorithm can detect cervical precancer/cancer with higher accuracy than conventional cytology, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Less Deep Sleep in Elderly Tied to Alzheimer Disease Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Older people who have less slow wave sleep have higher levels of the brain protein tau, a marker of brain damage and Alzheimer disease (AD), according to a study published in the Jan. 9 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Obesity Linked to Lower Gray Matter Brain Volume

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with lower gray matter brain volumes, according to a study published online Jan. 9 in Neurology.

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Many Female Health Care Workers Live in Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. female health care workers, particularly women of color, live in poverty and lack health insurance, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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IC Nicardipine Promising for Tx of Spontaneous Coronary Slow-Flow

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Intracoronary (IC) administration of nicardipine seems to be highly effective in reversing spontaneous coronary slow-flow (CSF), according to a study published online Dec. 15 in the Journal of Invasive Cardiology.

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USPSTF Affirms Guidance for Hep B Screening at First Prenatal Visit

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection screening in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement published online Jan. 8 by the task force.

Draft Recommendation Statement
Draft Evidence Review
Comment on Recommendation

Racial Differences ID'd in Some Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Certain molecular biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease differ with race, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Neurology.

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Cervical Cancer Screening Rates 'Unacceptably Low'

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Less than two-thirds of eligible 30- to 65-year-old women are up to date with cervical cancer screening, and Pap completion rates have decreased over time, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Women's Health.

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ACA Coverage Gains Could Erode Without Individual Mandate

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eliminating the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty is unlikely to destabilize the individual market in California but could roll back coverage gains, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Screening Donated Blood for Zika Not Cost-Effective

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screening donated blood for Zika virus is cost-effective only in the high mosquito season in Puerto Rico, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Rx Opioids Up Pneumonia Risk in Patients With, Without HIV

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribed opioids are associated with an increased risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization among persons with and without HIV, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors at Risk for Later Cancers

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remain at increased risk for developing subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs), according to research published online Dec. 17 in Cancer.

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Sex Differences ID'd in Response to Glioblastoma Treatment

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sex differences have been identified in response to therapy among glioblastoma (GBM) patients, according to a study published in the Jan. 2 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Newborn Genomic Sequencing Can Identify Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Newborn genomic sequencing (nGS) can detect the risk for disease onset during childhood and actionable adult-onset disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 3 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

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Anemia Criteria Assist Decision on Type of Colorectal Cancer Screen

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In patients without broad-definition anemia and/or abdominal mass, flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS), instead of colonoscopy, may suffice to rule out colorectal cancer, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in the British Journal of Cancer.

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U.S. Doctor Monitored for Ebola Exposure in Nebraska Hospital

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An American doctor is being treated at a Nebraska medical center for possible exposure to the Ebola virus while providing medical care in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is in the middle of an Ebola outbreak that has left more than 300 dead.

CBS News Article
More Information: CDC

Proportion of Cancers Due to Excess Body Weight Varies by State

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of cancer cases in men and women are attributable to excess body weight (EBW), with variation in the proportion among states, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in JAMA Oncology.

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