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October 2016 Briefing - Pathology

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pathology for October 2016. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Low and High HDL Tied to Increased Risk of Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low and high levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are linked to increased mortality risk, according to a study published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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New Way Bacteria Can Trigger Inflammation in Acne Identified

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In research published online Oct. 28 in Science Immunology, scientists say they've discovered a previously unrecognized way in which bacteria trigger inflammation in the skin.

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Few Changes in Employer-Sponsored Insurance 2013-2014

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Epithelial Thickness Is Marker for Gastroesophageal Reflux

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Epithelial thickness seems to be a marker for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to research published in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Whites Have Longest Survival in Cutaneous Melanoma

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with cutaneous melanoma, whites have the longest survival time, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Review: Reduced Risk of Death for Left-Sided Colon Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The side of origin of colon cancer (CC) impacts prognosis, with reduced risk of death for left-sided CC (LCC), according to a review published online Oct. 27 in JAMA Oncology.

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HIV Active in Tissues Even in Patients on Antiretrovirals

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking antiretroviral medications, HIV continues to reside in tissues, and though this may not cause AIDS, it could contribute to the development of unrelated conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Virology.

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Child-Parent Screening for Hypercholesterolemia Feasible

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for hypercholesterolemia is feasible at routine child immunization visits in primary care practices, according to a study published in the Oct. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Subconjunctival Gentamicin Can Cause Macular Necrosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Subconjunctival gentamicin can cause macular necrosis in the eye, according to a letter to the editor published online Oct. 20 in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

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New Research Maps Origins of HIV/AIDS in North America

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Using genetic analyses of 40-year-old blood samples, scientists have arrived at a clearer understanding of the introduction and spread of HIV in North America. The new genetic research was published online Oct. 26 in Nature.

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Even Young Blood Vessels Can Be Damaged by Air Pollution

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Even young, healthy adults can suffer endothelial injury from air pollution, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Circulation Research.

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Statins Offset Insulin-Related Cancer Risk in T2DM

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), use of statins offsets insulin-related cancer risks, according to research published online Oct. 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Low CA Risk for Premenopausal Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding have low risk of endometrial cancer and atypical hyperplasia, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Survival Outcomes Similar for Short-, Long-Term Blood Storage

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Using the freshest blood for transfusions does not appear to significantly improve patient survival, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Recommendations for Secondary Prevention of Cervical Cancer

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a Clinical Practice Guideline published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Global Oncology, recommendations are presented for the secondary prevention of cervical cancer.

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Factors ID'd for Recurrence After Radical Cystectomy

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing robot-assisted radical cystectomy, predictors of recurrence include mainly tumor characteristics, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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More Than Half of Melanomas Are Self-Detected

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of melanomas are self-detected, and more melanomas are self-detected by women than men, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Advantages of FIT As CRC Screening Method Discussed

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) has advantages as a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening method, and should be a component of a screening program, according to an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Oct. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Smoking Still Responsible for Many U.S. Cancer Deaths

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of cancer deaths among Americans aged 35 or older are caused by smoking, and the rate is much higher in the South, according to research published online Oct. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Fewer Uncertain Thyroid Results With Core Needle vs Repeat FNA

MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- To reduce inconclusive results for thyroid nodules, core-needle biopsy (CNB) is more effective than repeat fine-needle aspiration (FNA), according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Head & Neck.

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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Deaths Down 1999 to 2014

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2014 the numbers of deaths, both accidental and intentional, due to carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning significantly declined in the United States, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Higher Grade Disease at Prostatectomy With Surveillance

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For men with low-risk prostate cancer, those who enter active surveillance have higher grade of disease at prostatectomy, but no difference in other adverse pathological outcomes, compared to those undergoing immediate surgery, according to a study published in the November issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Men With Genetic Risk of CRC May Lower Risk Via Healthy Lifestyle

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy living can lower the odds for colorectal cancer (CRC) for men who are at high genetic risk for the disease, according to research published online recently in Genetics in Medicine.

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Surveillance Rates on Rise in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than 90 percent of men in Sweden who have very low-risk prostate cancer choose close monitoring rather than immediate treatment -- and more American men should use that option, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in JAMA Oncology.

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Digestive Byproduct of Meat Linked to Mortality Risk in PAD

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who also have high levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a by-product of meat consumption, may have a higher risk of dying within five years, compared with those with the lowest levels, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Lower Bone Density Seen in Heavy Users of Cannabis

THURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy cannabis users have lower bone density compared to cigarette smokers, according to a new study published online Sept. 1 in The American Journal of Medicine.

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CDC: STD Rates at Unprecedented High in the United States

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sexually transmitted disease (STD) cases reached a record high in the United States in 2015, according to the annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report released Oct. 19 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Nitrate-Reducing Oral Microbes Linked to Migraines

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with migraines have higher levels of certain microbes in their mouths and digestive systems, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in mSystems, a journal from the American Society for Microbiology.

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Less Frequent Cervical CA Screens May Be OK After HPV Vaccine

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women vaccinated with earlier versions of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine may only need cervical cancer screening every five years starting at age 25 or 30, and women who've received the updated vaccine need screening even less often, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Urine Concentration Aids UTI Diagnosis in Young Infants

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For infants undergoing microscopic urinalysis as part of urinary tract infection (UTI) evaluation, urine concentration should be included in the interpretation, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

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Considerable Economic Burden for Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For U.S. adults, the economic burden associated with vaccine-preventable diseases was estimated at about $9 billion in 2015, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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SHBG, Total Estradiol Linked to Type 2 Diabetes in Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For women, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and total estradiol (TE) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to research published online Oct. 10 in Diabetes.

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Herbal, Dietary Supplements Cause One-Fifth of Hepatotoxicity

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Herbal and dietary supplement (HDS)-induced liver injury accounts for 20 percent of cases of hepatotoxicity in the United States, according to research published online Sept. 27 in Hepatology.

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HBV, HCV Coinfection Ups Non-Hodgkin Risk in ART-Treated HIV

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) among patients with HIV receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART), according to a study published online Oct. 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Regulatory T Cells Decreased With Farm Exposure at Age 6

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- At age 6 years, regulatory T cells (Tregs) are decreased with farm exposure and increased among those with asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Allergy.

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Liver Stiffness Linked to Hepatic Events, Death in Hepatitis B

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is associated with hepatic events and death, while metabolic syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in Hepatology.

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Adolescent BMI Predicts Diabetes Mellitus Mortality

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent body mass index (BMI) predicts diabetes mellitus (DM) mortality in midlife, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Mutations Identified in Uterine, Ovarian Carcinosarcomas

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Carcinosarcomas (CSs) of the uterus and ovary have mutations in cancer genes previously identified in uterine and ovarian carcinomas and in genes encoding histones H2A and H2B, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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High BMI, Large Waist, T2DM Tied to Increased Odds of Liver Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having a large waistline, a high body mass index (BMI), and type 2 diabetes may raise risk for liver cancer, according to research published online Oct. 14 in Cancer Research.

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New Active Zika Transmission Area in Miami-Dade County

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new active Zika transmission zone was declared Thursday by Florida health officials.

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Two Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease Identified

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Crohn's disease appears to have at least two distinct genetic subtypes, which could explain why the condition is so hard to treat, according to research published online Oct. 14 in Gut.

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Snus Use Tied to Higher Risk of Prostate Cancer Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A type of smokeless tobacco called snus may increase a prostate cancer patient's mortality risk, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the International Journal of Cancer.

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Molecular Autopsy Finds Cause in 40 Percent of Unexpected Deaths

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Molecular autopsy is able to uncover a likely or plausible cause of death in 40 percent of cases of unexpected death in young people, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Migrants Screened for Active TB Pose Negligible Transmission Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Migrants from countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis who undergo screening before entry to low-incidence countries pose a negligible risk of onward transmission but are at increased risk of the infection, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in The Lancet.

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Androgen Deprivation Therapy May Raise Dementia Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of dementia might be doubled for prostate cancer patients who are treated with androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), according to a study published online Oct. 13 in JAMA Oncology.

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Downward Trend in U.S. Breast Cancer Mortality Continues

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The racial gap for breast cancer mortality is closing, particularly among younger women, according to research published in the Oct. 14 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Isolated From Semen

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first complete genome sequence of a sample of Zika virus derived from semen has been obtained, according to research published in the September/October issue of Genome Announcements.

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Obesity Ups Risk for Secondary Primary Cancers in Men

FRIDAY, Oct. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity before a cancer diagnosis is associated with an increased risk for overall and individual secondary primary cancers (SPCs) in males, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Second Trimester Lipids Can ID Gestational Diabetes

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early second trimester lipids can identify maternal gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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Late-Pregnancy Zika Infection Can Still Affect Fetal Brain

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The Zika virus may harm a infant's brain even if the mother is infected just before giving birth, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Calcium Supplements May Be Detrimental to Heart Health

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium in the form of supplements, but not calcium-rich foods, might have a harmful impact on the heart, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Cryoablation May Be Alternative to Breast Cancer Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cryoablation can successfully treat the majority of small breast cancers with few side effects or complications, according to a small study published recently in the Annals of Surgical Oncology.

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Low HDL-C, High TG Increase Risk for Diabetic Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with diabetes, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and high triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with increased risk of diabetic kidney disease (defined as low estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], an eGFR reduction >30 percent, and/or albuminuria), according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes Care.

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High-Protein Diet Doesn't Improve Insulin Sensitivity

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal obese women who lose weight eating a high-protein diet may not experience any improvements in insulin sensitivity, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of Cell Reports.

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DEET to Protect Against Zika Appears Safe During Pregnancy

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) insect repellents won't harm a pregnant woman or her fetus when used as instructed to prevent Zika infection, according to research published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CDI Risk Up When Prior Occupant of Hospital Bed Got Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When a hospital patient is taking antibiotics, the next patient to use the same bed may face an elevated risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Midlife Hypertension Appears Detrimental to Cognitive Function

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Midlife hypertension may increase risk for dementia later in life, according to a new scientific statement published online Oct. 10 in Hypertension.

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Genetic Increase in SBP Linked to Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) due to genetic variants is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 4 in Diabetes.

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Gene Associated With Risk of Acute Otitis Media

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A potential genetic link to a child's higher risk of acute otitis media has been identified, according to research published online Sept. 28 in Nature Communications.

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U.S. Health Care System Is One of the Least Efficient Worldwide

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system is one of the least efficient worldwide based on a Bloomberg index that assesses life expectancy, health care spending per capita, and relative spending as a share of gross domestic product, according to a report published by Bloomberg.

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Hospitalizations in Pregnancy, Delivery Stable for HIV-Infected

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2011 there was no increase in the number of hospitalizations during pregnancy and delivery for HIV-infected women, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Unique Skin Phenotype for Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have a different skin phenotype from that of adult patients, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Ghrelin May Predict Cognitive Impairment

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Blood levels of ghrelin may be a predictor of executive function impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation.

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Dental Bacteria Generally Not Tied to Rheumatoid Arthritis

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibodies to periodontal bacteria are generally not associated with elevated risk of rheumatoid factor (RF), according to a study published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Males Conceived Via ICSI May Have Sperm Abnormalities

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Males who were conceived using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) may have lower sperm quantity and quality than those conceived naturally, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Human Reproduction.

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Strategies Presented for Managing Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Effective strategies for managing physician burnout include mindfulness and stress-management training, according to a review published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet.

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Global Burden of Disease Report Evaluates the World's Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The United States lags behind other advanced nations when it comes to infant mortality and the life expectancy of its citizens, according to a comprehensive review of global health statistics published in the Oct. 8 issue of The Lancet.

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Zinc Alters Gut Microbiota, Cuts Resistance to C. difficile

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary zinc (Zn) alters the gut microbiota and affects resistance to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), according to research published online Sept. 26 in Nature Medicine.

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Exposure to LDL-C-Lowering Genetic Variants Ups T2DM Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering genetic variants are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published in the Oct. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC Reviews Measles Outbreak in Amish Community

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The measles outbreak that occurred in an Amish community in 2014 illustrates the ongoing threat the infection presents -- and the importance of routine vaccination, U.S. government researchers report in the Oct. 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Evidence of Zika Connection to Guillain-Barré Syndrome

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In a new report, published online Oct. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine, an international team of researchers says it has developed the strongest evidence to date that Zika virus can cause Guillain-Barré syndrome.

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Scientists Claim Limit to Human Life Span Has Been Reached

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The average maximum human life span is 115 years, and the absolute limit of human life span will be 125 years, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Nature.

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Industry-Funded Team Says Algorithm Improves HbA1c Value

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Industry-funded researchers say they've developed a way to improve the accuracy of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing, according to a report published in the Oct. 5 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Burden of Cirrhosis, Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure Increasing

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2011 there was a considerable increase in the burden of cirrhosis and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF), according to research published online Oct. 3 in Hepatology.

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Low Incidence of Cervical Cancer, CIN3+ for HPV-Negative Women

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative women have low long-term incidence of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or worse (CIN3+), which supports an extension of the cervical screening interval beyond five years for certain women, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in The BMJ.

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NASH ID'd by Mass Spectrometry-Based Profiling, Clinical Variables

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Mass spectrometry (MS)-based profiling combined with clinical variables can identify nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), according to a study published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Childhood Trauma Tied to Higher Odds of Shorter Telomeres

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who have experienced stress as children appear to have an increased risk of shorter telomeres, according to research published online Oct. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Distinct Duodenal Bacteria in Celiac Disease, Controls

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Duodenal bacteria from patients with celiac disease (CD) and healthy individuals have distinct effects on gluten breakdown and immunogenicity, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Zika Virus Found in Sperm, Not Just Semen

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- In correspondence published in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases, researchers report that the Zika virus has been found inside the sperm of a man who had just returned from French Guyana.

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Men With Zika Exposure to Abstain From Conceiving Longer

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released new recommendations on how long men with either Zika infection or exposure should abstain from trying to conceive. The recommendations have been published in the Sept. 30 early-release issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC Updates Zika Travel Advisory for Southeast Asia

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has posted Zika virus-related special travel considerations for 11 Southeastern Asian countries.

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Doctors Spending in Excess of $32,000 on Health IT

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are spending more than $32,000 per year on health information technology (IT), according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Researchers Question Value of Web-Based Test for Prediabetes

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A simple, seven-question test for prediabetes may be needlessly sending millions of healthy Americans to their physicians for follow-up testing, according to a research letter published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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New AMA Module Helps Identify Physician Distress

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new resource has been developed to help physicians identify distressed colleagues and help them to access care, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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CT Colonography May Be Useful for Aneurysm Detection

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Routine assessment of the aorta during a computed tomography colonography (CTC) may aid in aneurysm detection, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology.

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Prevalence of Allergic Sensitization Increases With Age

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of allergic sensitization increases with age, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Allergy.

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