Educational Handout May Increase Receipt of Child Flu Shot

Providing educational intervention in waiting room before pediatric provider visit may be beneficial

TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Providing an educational handout about influenza disease in the waiting room before a pediatric provider visit may increase receipt of child influenza vaccine, according to a study published online July 8 in Pediatrics.

Vanessa P. Scott, M.D., from Columbia University in New York City, and colleagues randomly assigned a convenience sample of parents of children aged ≥6 months to receive usual care, an educational handout about influenza disease that was based on local data, or an educational handout about influenza disease based on national data in a 1:1:1 ratio. Parents received the handout while waiting for their child's visit.

The researchers found that the odds of child influenza vaccine receipt by the end of the season were significantly increased for parents who received an intervention versus usual care (74.9 versus 65.4 percent; adjusted odds ratio, 1.68); no increase was noted in vaccine receipt on the day of the clinic visit. Compared with those receiving usual care, parents who received the national data handout had increased odds of child influenza vaccine receipt on the day of the clinic visit (59.0 versus 52.6 percent; adjusted odds ratio, 1.79), but not by the end of the season.

"Comparing modes of information delivery (paper handout, text messaging, video, and interactive social media) and including cost-effectiveness analyses may help increase child influenza vaccine receipt and promote feasibility of implementation," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to the Pfizer Medical Education Group.

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