January 2019 Briefing - Pulmonology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for January 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Approves First Generic Version of Advair for Asthma, COPD

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic form of the Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate and salmeterol inhalation powder) inhaler has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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E-Cigarettes More Effective for Smoking Cessation

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes are more effective for smoking cessation than nicotine replacement therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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No Asthma Benefit Seen With n3PUFA in Overweight Teens

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Omega-3 fatty acid (n3PUFA) supplements do not appear to improve asthma control in teens and young adults who are overweight or obese, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Lean Body Mass in Childhood Linked to Lung Function at 15

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Higher lean body mass during childhood and adolescence is associated with higher lung function at age 15 years for both sexes, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Report IDs Areas Lacking Good Practice in Health Tech Assessment

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a report published in the January issue of Value in Health, an ISPOR--The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research working group indicates the lack of good practices in three areas of health technology assessment (HTA).

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CDC: Proportion of Increased-Risk Deceased Organ Donors on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among deceased organ donors, there has been an increase in the proportion at increased risk for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV to recipients, according to research published in the Jan. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Plasma Marker Predicts Allograft Failure in Lung Transplant

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Donor-derived cell-free DNA (ddcfDNA) is a potential biomarker that can predict allograft failure after lung transplantation, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in EBioMedicine.

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Ambient Air Pollution Exposure Linked to Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ambient air pollution exposure is associated with sleep apnea, according to a study recently published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Artificial Intelligence System Can Triage Chest Radiographs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- An artificial intelligence (AI) system based on deep convolutional neural networks (CNN) can accurately detect normal chest radiographs, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Radiology.

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FDA Chief Threatens to Halt E-Cigarette Sales

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sales of electronic cigarettes could be halted if companies do not stop marketing the devices to youth, U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., warned.

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FDA Down to 5 Weeks of Funding to Review New Drug Applications

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the federal government shutdown, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only about five weeks of funding left to review new drug applications, according to Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

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Antibiotics Often Inappropriately Prescribed for Bronchiolitis in ED

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most children younger than 2 years with bronchiolitis seen in U.S. emergency departments and prescribed antibiotics have no documented bacterial coinfection, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

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Asthma Undiagnosed in One in Five Urban Adolescents

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of undiagnosed asthma is 20.2 percent among urban adolescents, according to a study published online Jan. 15 in the Journal of Urban Health.

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Adoption of Advanced Health IT Capabilities Inconsistent

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of advanced health information technology (HIT) capabilities is inconsistent across health care systems, with electronic health record (EHR) standardization being the strongest predictor of advanced capabilities, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

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Complications Higher Than Expected for Invasive Lung Tests

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of complications after invasive diagnostic procedures for lung abnormalities are higher in the community setting than in clinical trials, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Suicide Risk Up More Than Fourfold for Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients have an increased suicide risk, which is predominant among men and white patients, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Communications.

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Study Explores Influence of Genetics, Environment in Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The influence of heritability and environmental factors has been identified for a large number of phenotypes, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Nature Genetics.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Can Help Cut COPD Exacerbations

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation safely and substantially reduces the rate of moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations in patients with baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels <25 nmol/L, according to a review published online Jan. 10 in Thorax.

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Comorbidities Adversely Linked to Cancer Trial Participation

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For cancer patients, the presence of comorbidities is adversely linked to trial discussions, trial offers, and trial participation, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in JAMA Oncology.

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American College of Physicians Releases 7th Edition of Ethics Manual

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ethical principles are discussed in an updated Ethics Manual, issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published as a supplement to the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Median Survival for Stage 4 ALK-Positive NSCLC Nearly 7 Years

MONDAY, Jan. 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The median overall survival (OS) from diagnosis for patients with stage IV anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 6.8 years, according to a study published online Dec. 29 in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology.

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CDC: Flu Cases Hit 7 Million in the United States

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The flu season is picking up steam, with about 7 million Americans having been struck by a strain of the flu virus, health officials said Friday.

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Prices Still Explain High U.S. Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in health spending between the United States and other countries is still explained by health care prices, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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E-Cigarette Aerosol Exposure Tied to Asthma Symptoms

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand exposure to electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) aerosols may be related to asthma symptoms in youth, according to a study published in the January issue of CHEST.

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Private Equity Acquisition of Physician Practices Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The phenomenon of private equity acquisition of physician practices is discussed in an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Female Health Care Workers Live in Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. female health care workers, particularly women of color, live in poverty and lack health insurance, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Depression Tied to Worse Asthma Outcomes in Urban Teens

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms are prevalent among urban teens with asthma and are associated with worse outcomes, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in Academic Pediatrics.

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Increase in Brand-Name Drug Cost Mainly Due to Existing Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of oral and injectable brand-name drugs increased from 2008 to 2016, with most of the increase due to existing drugs, while new drugs accounted for cost increases in specialty and generic drugs, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Medical Marketing Has Increased in Past 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 through 2016, there was an increase in medical marketing, especially direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising, according to research published in the Jan. 1/8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Costs Higher for Those With Comorbid Noncommunicable Diseases

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of having two noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is generally superadditive, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in PLOS Medicine.

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Antibiotics Prescribed for Children More Often at Nonpediatric EDs

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most emergency visits by children occur at nonpediatric emergency departments, which have more frequent antibiotic prescribing, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Single-Family Rooms May Benefit Very Preterm Infants

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For extremely preterm infants, the use of single-family rooms is associated with reduced sepsis incidence and improvements in breastfeeding rates during hospital stays but with no difference in long-term neurodevelopment, according to a review published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

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Strict Ordinances Tied to Lower Youth Tobacco Use

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Strict local tobacco retail licensing (TRL) regulation may lower rates of cigarette and electronic cigarette use among youth and young adults, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in Pediatrics.

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Muscle Atrophy Occurs Rapidly in Critically Ill, Ventilated Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Children receiving invasive mechanical ventilation for ≥48 hours often experience muscle atrophy, especially in the diaphragm, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in PLOS ONE.

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Cancer Death Rate in U.S. Decreased Continuously From 1991 to 2016

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The overall cancer death rate decreased continuously by 27 percent from 1991 to 2016, according to a report published online Jan. 8 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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ACA Coverage Gains Could Erode Without Individual Mandate

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eliminating the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty is unlikely to destabilize the individual market in California but could roll back coverage gains, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

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Rx Opioids Up Pneumonia Risk in Patients With, Without HIV

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribed opioids are associated with an increased risk for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization among persons with and without HIV, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Cuts Flu-Related Hospitalization in COPD Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) hospitalization, influenza vaccination is associated with a significant reduction in influenza-related hospitalization, according to a study published online Jan. 4 in CHEST.

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Home Monitoring of Lung Function Feasible in Teens With Duchenne

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescent patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), use of a handheld device (HHD) to assess pulmonary function at home is feasible and provides reliable data, according to an analysis recently published in the Journal of Neuromuscular Diseases.

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Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors at Risk for Later Cancers

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) remain at increased risk for developing subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs), according to research published online Dec. 17 in Cancer.

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In-Hospital Morbidity, Mortality Up With Flu in Heart Failure

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with heart failure, influenza infection is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in JACC: Heart Failure.

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Patients With Sleep Apnea Have Increased Gout Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at higher risk for developing gout than patients without OSA for more than a year after diagnosis, according to a study published in the January issue of Arthritis & Rheumatology.

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Child Pneumonia Rate Dropped Globally From 2000 to 2015

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The global incidence of child pneumonia and related mortality decreased substantially from 2000 to 2015, consistent with decreases in the prevalence of some key risk factors, according to a study published in the January issue of The Lancet Global Health.

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Smoking Habits Do Not Differ for Teens With, Without Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking habits do not differ for adolescents with asthma or their parents versus those without asthma, according to a letter to the editor published online Dec. 4 in Allergy.

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