January 2019 Briefing - Surgery

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for January 2019. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Liver Transplant Wait List May Not Prioritize High-Risk Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The current method for ranking patients on the liver transplantation wait list may not prioritize some of the sickest candidates, according to a study recently published online in Gastroenterology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Death at 10 Years Similar With Bilateral-, Single-Artery CABG

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There is no difference in the rate of death from any cause at 10 years for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with bilateral or single internal-thoracic-artery grafting, according to a study published in the Jan. 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Thymectomy + PDN Beneficial for Non-Thymomatous Myasthenia Gravis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis, thymectomy plus prednisone confers benefits versus prednisone alone at five years, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Severe Injuries Sustained at Jump Parks Versus Home Trampolines

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of fractures/dislocations, lower-extremity fractures, fractures in adults, and surgical interventions is higher for injuries associated with jump parks versus home trampolines, according to a study published in the Jan. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Evidence Lacking for Benefit of Surgery for Vertebral Fractures

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical procedures do not appear to provide significant benefit for patients with vertebral fractures (VF), according to a second American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Task Force report published in the January issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Paclitaxel Exposure in Vascular Device Not Linked to Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to paclitaxel in drug-coated balloons used in procedures for the treatment of symptomatic femoropopliteal peripheral arterial disease is not associated with mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Comorbid Neck Injury Up for Women With Concussion

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Female patients with a concussion-related emergency department visit have an increased risk for comorbid neck injury, according to a study published online Dec. 28 in the Journal of Women's Health.

Abstract/Full Text

Assay Aids Anticoagulant Dosing of Obese Patients for Bariatric Sx

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) may provide better information than anti-factor Xa (anti-XA) in determining the best dosage for blood thinners among obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, according to a study recently published in Surgery for Obesity and Related Disorders.

Abstract/Full Text

Report IDs Areas Lacking Good Practice in Health Tech Assessment

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- In a report published in the January issue of Value in Health, an ISPOR--The Professional Society for Health Economics and Outcomes Research working group indicates the lack of good practices in three areas of health technology assessment (HTA).

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cognitive Scores After Kidney Transplant Tied to Frailty

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Frail kidney transplant recipients have lower cognitive scores than nonfrail recipients four years after transplant, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Texting Intervention Engages Patients After Joint Arthroplasty

FRIDAY, Jan. 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A text-messaging (Short Message Service [SMS]) bot is effective for increasing patient engagement after primary total knee or hip arthroplasty, according to a study published in the Jan. 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text

CDC: Proportion of Increased-Risk Deceased Organ Donors on Rise

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Among deceased organ donors, there has been an increase in the proportion at increased risk for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV to recipients, according to research published in the Jan. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

Gun Injury Hospitalization Cost Over $911 Million 2010 to 2015

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The average annual cost of inpatient hospitalizations for firearm injury exceeded $911 million from 2010 to 2015, with 9.5 percent of that amount due to readmissions, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in PLOS ONE.

Abstract/Full Text

Time to Breast Cancer Surgery Delayed for Non-Hispanic Blacks

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The time to surgery (TTS) after a breast cancer diagnosis is delayed for non-Hispanic black (NHB) versus non-Hispanic white (NHW) women, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Plasma Marker Predicts Allograft Failure in Lung Transplant

THURSDAY, Jan. 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Donor-derived cell-free DNA (ddcfDNA) is a potential biomarker that can predict allograft failure after lung transplantation, according to a study published online Jan. 23 in EBioMedicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Renal Transplant Improves Survival in ESRD Due to Lupus

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to lupus nephritis (LN), renal transplant is associated with a survival benefit, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Liver Transplants for Alcohol-Linked Disease Increased From 2002 to 2016

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of liver transplants for alcohol-associated liver disease (ALD) increased from 2002 to 2016, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Exome Sequencing Beneficial for Pediatric Kidney Recipients

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-exome sequencing (WES) can identify a genetic cause for almost one-third of pediatric kidney transplant recipients, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Repeat Tubal Procedures Up After Hysteroscopic Sterilization

TUESDAY, Jan. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hysteroscopic sterilization is associated with an increased risk for additional tubal intervention within seven years compared with laparoscopic sterilization, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Variation in Revascularization for Asymptomatic SIHD Unexplained

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For asymptomatic patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) and coronary artery disease (CAD), there is considerable variation in revascularization practice that is not explained by known factors, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Investigating Paclitaxel-Coated Balloons, Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration alerted health care providers on Thursday that the agency is investigating the use of paclitaxel-coated balloons and paclitaxel-eluting stents to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the femoropopliteal artery because of a potentially increased mortality risk in the long term.

More Information

FDA Down to 5 Weeks of Funding to Review New Drug Applications

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the federal government shutdown, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has only about five weeks of funding left to review new drug applications, according to Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.

CNN News Article

Nerve Transfer Promising for Acute Flaccid Myelitis Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Two patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis and upper-extremity neuropathy who were treated with peripheral nerve transfer continue to demonstrate functional recovery at two years, according to a case series recently published in Pediatric Neurology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Adoption of Advanced Health IT Capabilities Inconsistent

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of advanced health information technology (HIT) capabilities is inconsistent across health care systems, with electronic health record (EHR) standardization being the strongest predictor of advanced capabilities, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Managed Care.

Abstract/Full Text

Liver Transplant Survival May Improve With Race Matching

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- For African-American patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undergoing liver transplantation, donor-recipient race matching is associated with improved survival, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Accidental IV Dislodgement Reported to Be Very Common

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians perceive accidental dislodgement of intravenous (IV) devices to be a common occurrence, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access.

Abstract/Full Text

Personalized Tx May Extend Life in CKD With Small Renal Tumors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Personalized treatment selection may extend life expectancy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and small renal tumors (≤4 cm), according to a study published online Jan. 15 in Radiology.

Abstract/Full Text

American College of Physicians Releases 7th Edition of Ethics Manual

TUESDAY, Jan. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ethical principles are discussed in an updated Ethics Manual, issued by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and published as a supplement to the Jan. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

American College of Physicians Ethics Manual
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Red Cross Issues Emergency Call for Blood Donations

MONDAY, Jan 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The holidays, winter weather, and the flu season have all prompted a blood shortage, the American Red Cross warns.

More Information

Sociodemographic Factors Predict Recovery After Traumatic Injury

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Most traditional measures of injury severity may not be predictive of trauma recovery, but some sociodemographic characteristics are predictive of recovery, according to a study published online Dec. 13 in the Annals of Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Persistent Opioid Use High in Head, Neck Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent opioid use at three and six months remains high among patients undergoing treatment for head and neck squamous cell cancer, according to a study recently published in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prices Still Explain High U.S. Health Care Spending

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The difference in health spending between the United States and other countries is still explained by health care prices, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors Question State Lawsuits Over Pelvic Mesh Products

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- State lawsuits over pelvic mesh products could scare women away from the products or even get them removed from the market, a group of doctors say.

AP News Article

Private Equity Acquisition of Physician Practices Discussed

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The phenomenon of private equity acquisition of physician practices is discussed in an Ideas and Opinions piece published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fewer Than 5 Percent of Thyroid Surgery Patients Readmitted

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Readmissions after thyroid surgery are relatively low, and more than half occur within a week after discharge, according to a study recently published in Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fewer Complications Found With Hybrid Surgery for Esophageal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Hybrid minimally invasive esophagectomy results in lower incidence of intraoperative and postoperative major complications compared with open esophagectomy for esophageal cancer, according to a study published in the Jan. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Female Health Care Workers Live in Poverty

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. female health care workers, particularly women of color, live in poverty and lack health insurance, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the American Journal of Public Health.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increase in Brand-Name Drug Cost Mainly Due to Existing Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of oral and injectable brand-name drugs increased from 2008 to 2016, with most of the increase due to existing drugs, while new drugs accounted for cost increases in specialty and generic drugs, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Marketing Has Increased in Past 20 Years

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 through 2016, there was an increase in medical marketing, especially direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising, according to research published in the Jan. 1/8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Editor's Note (subscription or payment may be required)

ACA Coverage Gains Could Erode Without Individual Mandate

TUESDAY, Jan. 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Eliminating the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate penalty is unlikely to destabilize the individual market in California but could roll back coverage gains, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Screening Donated Blood for Zika Not Cost-Effective

MONDAY, Jan. 7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Screening donated blood for Zika virus is cost-effective only in the high mosquito season in Puerto Rico, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Classification Predicts One-Year Trauma Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- During early recovery, patients with orthopedic trauma can be classified into risk and protective clusters that help to predict 12-month functional and health outcomes, according to a study published online Dec. 19 in JAMA Surgery.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hypertension With Psoriasis Tied to More Cardiac Interventions

FRIDAY, Jan. 4, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Psoriasis is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular interventions in patients with hypertension, according to a study published in the December issue of The Journal of Dermatology.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Reveals High Rate of Phlebitis Caused by IV Cannulas

THURSDAY, Jan. 3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of phlebitis caused by peripheral intravenous cannula insertions may be higher among patients with certain risk factors, according to a study published online Dec. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model Cuts Costs

WEDNESDAY, Jan 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The Medicare-implemented Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) bundled-payment model reduces spending for hip or knee replacement, according to a study published online Jan. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Last Updated: