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April 2020 Briefing - Urology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for April 2020. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Symptomatic Health Care Staff in U.K. Screened for COVID-19

THURSDAY, April 30, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Screening symptomatic health care workers for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is feasible during the pandemic, according to a research letter published online April 22 in The Lancet.

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David Shulkin, M.D., on COVID-19 Financial Consequences for Health Care System

MONDAY, April 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Health care organizations are facing hard financial decisions amid the COVID-19 pandemic, but an end is in sight as some are beginning to slowly open back up around the country, according to David Shulkin, M.D. Shulkin, who served as ninth secretary for Veterans Affairs and is former president and CEO of Beth Israel Medical Center in New York, spoke with HealthDay during a live stream on the HealthDay YouTube channel and live blog.

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KIMT3 Article

Roadmap Developed for Resuming Elective Surgery During COVID-19

MONDAY, April 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A roadmap for resuming elective surgery after new cases of COVID-19 begin to wane is presented in a joint statement published by the American College of Surgeons and other societies.

Joint Statement

SARS-CoV-2 Not Detected in Semen After COVID-19 Recovery

MONDAY, April 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is not detected in the semen of patients one month after COVID-19 diagnosis, according to a study published online April 17 in Fertility and Sterility.

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SARS-CoV-2 Stays in Respiratory Samples Longer in Severely Ill

FRIDAY, April 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The median duration of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA is significantly longer in the respiratory samples of patients with severe versus mild disease, according to a study published online April 21 in The BMJ.

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Scoring System Helps Guide Surgical Care During COVID-19

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A scoring system for medically necessary time-sensitive (MeNTS) procedures can facilitate decision making and triage in the setting of COVID-19, according to a study published online April 9 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Benefit of Social Distancing Outweighs Economic Impact

MONDAY, April 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The economic benefits of lives saved through social distancing substantially outweigh the value of the projected losses to the U.S. economy, according to a study to be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis.

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SARS-CoV-2 Contamination of Air, Surfaces Examined in ICU, Wards

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Considerable severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) contamination of air and object surfaces is reported in intensive care units (ICUs) and general coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) wards (GW), according to a study published online April 10 in Emerging Infectious Diseases, a publication of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Medical Masks May Be Sufficient During COVID-19 Routine Care

TUESDAY, April 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Use of medical masks, such as surgical or procedural masks, does not increase the risk for viral infection or respiratory illness, and their use may serve as a protective measure in instances of N95 respirator shortages, according to the results of a meta-analysis published online April 4 in Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses.

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High Rates of Appropriate E-Consults Seen Across Specialties

MONDAY, April 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of appropriate electronic consultations (e-consults) are high across specialties, according to a study published online April 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Racial Disparity in Prostate Cancer Survival Tied to Region

MONDAY, April 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- National, race-based differences in prostate cancer survival are due to regional variation, even for low-risk prostate cancer, according to a study published online March 31 in JAMA Network Open.

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Editorial

Racial Differences Seen for Cancer Diagnosis, Treatment, Survival

THURSDAY, April 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Stage at diagnosis, treatment, and survival differ by race and ethnicity for patients with one of the nine leading cancers, according to a study published online April 8 in JAMA Network Open.

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Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Adjusted During COVID-19

TUESDAY, April 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a special article published online April 1 in Advances in Radiation Oncology, a framework is laid out for the management of radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

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Majority of Physicians Report Serious Concerns About COVID-19

MONDAY, April 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- According to a national survey conducted by Harvard Medical School, the RAND Corporation, and Doximity, practicing physicians currently report substantial concerns about supplies, the government response, and availability of testing amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Unemployed Workers Less Likely to Be Uninsured Post-ACA

THURSDAY, April 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Following implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), unemployed workers were less likely to be uninsured, and uninsurance rates decreased more in states with Medicaid expansion, according to a report from the Urban Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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